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cenomian ptychodus set


will stevenson

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will stevenson

hi guys i recently purchased a nice set of ptychodus teeth from the cenomian chalk of Wilmington,Devon, was told that they were likely associated, any help would be good, im thinking either ptychodus marginalis or mammilaris

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IMG_2598-compressed (1).JPG

IMG_2597-compressed (1).JPG

IMG_2596-compressed (1).JPG

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Where is this location, I need to visit it sometime :P. Sorry but can’t help with ID. Nice teeth though:envy: 

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will stevenson
1 hour ago, Pterygotus said:

Where is this location, I need to visit it sometime :P. Sorry but can’t help with ID. Nice teeth though:envy: 

This was from a very old collection I don’t think the location is around anymore I can’t find anything on it;) thanks I like them too

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Not meaning to be finicky, but just pointing out that it's not Cenomian, but rather Cenomanian.

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20 hours ago, will stevenson said:

This was from a very old collection I don’t think the location is around anymore I can’t find anything on it;) thanks I like them too

 

Hi Will Stevenson,

 

I think you have at least one high-crowned species and a low-crowned species and would agree that they could be P. mammilaris and P. marginalis.  They co-existed in the Turonian but I don't know if they might have also co-existed earlier in western Europe. 

 

That's a great group that you picked up.  Collectors used to look through where the mining company dumped excess rock back in the early 20th century and before but the advances in equipment allowed for more efficient processing of rock so there was little to nothing to look through later.  I have heard that people still find fossils occasionally.  I also heard that museums used to have so much from the Chalk that they traded what they considered extras for other specimens they wanted. 

 

Jess

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I have never traveled to this area of UK - "Devon".  But, the "Chalk Group" in SW UK includes Cenomanian to Campanian age rock.  That being said, I see at least two Ptychodus mammillaris (possibly of Coniacian age) on the left side of the display case and at least one Ptychodus polygyrus (aka P. marginalis in N. America) fourth from left - possibly of Turonian to Coniacian age. The other teeth are difficult to make out due to bad focus or small size, but the only Cenomanian age teeth might be Ptychodus anonymous - smaller higher crowned teeth on the right side. 

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will stevenson
On 09/04/2020 at 3:43 AM, LSCHNELLE said:

I have never traveled to this area of UK - "Devon".  But, the "Chalk Group" in SW UK includes Cenomanian to Campanian age rock.  That being said, I see at least two Ptychodus mammillaris (possibly of Coniacian age) on the left side of the display case and at least one Ptychodus polygyrus (aka P. marginalis in N. America) fourth from left - possibly of Turonian to Coniacian age. The other teeth are difficult to make out due to bad focus or small size, but the only Cenomanian age teeth might be Ptychodus anonymous - smaller higher crowned teeth on the right side. 

I will individually photograph them in focus and post them here, thanks for your help:)

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will stevenson

sorry guys the order I put them in messed up so it’s now middle to right then left to middle

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These are those I can make out (attached). I am not an expert - just learning from Shawn Hamm. I hope this helps. 

P. decurrens.jpg

P_polygyrus.jpg

P_mammillaris2.jpg

P_mammillaris1.jpg

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will stevenson
17 hours ago, LSCHNELLE said:

These are those I can make out (attached). I am not an expert - just learning from Shawn Hamm. I hope this helps. 

P. decurrens.jpg

P_polygyrus.jpg

P_mammillaris2.jpg

P_mammillaris1.jpg

Thanks so much (: so what did you think this one was?:P

51F0D254-5D4E-4E25-B4E5-EDA41C096E50.jpeg

40DDAF8B-FA6F-402F-BE93-4C615B3D98D1.jpeg

1D746CBF-5AC1-4273-B172-6C84DCD86E51.jpeg

CA40E92C-1E97-4E14-9D62-200F095FE2D0.jpeg

399EE736-57E0-4152-BCAD-CC56629A4A20.jpeg

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/12/2020 at 7:49 AM, will stevenson said:

Thanks so much (: so what did you think this one was?:P

51F0D254-5D4E-4E25-B4E5-EDA41C096E50.jpeg

40DDAF8B-FA6F-402F-BE93-4C615B3D98D1.jpeg

1D746CBF-5AC1-4273-B172-6C84DCD86E51.jpeg

CA40E92C-1E97-4E14-9D62-200F095FE2D0.jpeg

399EE736-57E0-4152-BCAD-CC56629A4A20.jpeg

These are my best guesses for the remainder.  Difficult to know for sure. 

P_occidentalis?.jpg

ProbableP_decurrens.jpg

Possible P_decurrens.jpg

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