mamaartemis

Septarian Nodule/pseudofossil, Rock Or Something I Need To Throw Out

10 posts in this topic

Hi all,

My dad picked this up on a walk in northeastern Oklahoma 15 or 20 years ago. I don't have any rock hound or fossil loving friends to ask, and I've looked at google-images, wiki entries and many other places (thanks to suggestions on where to look from the fossil forum advice to people needing an ID). I don't know if it is a rock, a pseudofossil, a fossil, some type of construction by-product or what.

It almost looked like some images of septarian nodules, but not quite. Anyway, here it is:

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post-2538-12594568769349_thumb.jpg

post-2538-12594569029262_thumb.jpg

If anyone can point me in the right direction, or tell me what I'm looking at, I'd appreciate it. Thanks, Laura

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well, i'll go out on a limb and say i think it could be an iron-based concretion. i like it. looks cool. and welcome to the forum.

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I'll 2nd tracer's "limb" reference...very interesting neat looking specimen.

Iron-based concretions "hematite" and other types end up looking pretty crazy sometimes...here's a link showing just some of the variety...scroll down to the pictures listed first from Wenzville, Mo. Pictures #'s 4 thru 8 look similar to yours, but a reverse type of pattern...Regards, Chris

http://meteorites.wustl.edu/id/concretions.htm

Again Welcome!

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I will echo the above.....guesses tentative identifications. Much of Oklahoma has a bunch of surface iron. The dirt is actually red from the rust content. Your specimen looks very much like hematite iron to these old eyes. I can see the resemblance to a turtle flipper or some such animal part, but I think that is serendipitous rather than actual replacement of any kind. Just my humble opinion though.

I also welcome you to the forum. I must add that you did a bang - up job taking the pix too, good job!

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I would say more or less the same that was already said by the other members.

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Hey, this limb's gettin' crowded!

<what's that cracking sound?>

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You guys are great! Many thanks for looking at this and lending your expertise. Really enjoyed reading the responses. Nice that not everyone is shopping!

Bear is right about the red dirt in some of Oklahoma; it is quite vivid. You can even get t-shirts dyed with the red dirt. It's weird how the soil varies across the state--where I live (and where the specimen was found) in northeastern Oklahoma the dirt is a nice dark brown.

I'm hearing that limb crack too--any dissenters? If so, let me know so I can have some more search terms for google. I have been going to town on google image with the new terms you've already mentioned, trying to find a really close match. The Wenzville specimens are the closest so far (thanks Plantguy).

I'm glad you liked the specimen and pictures; I wasn't sure I could get the pics in the message or not, but thanks to the guy who wrote up the directions, it was really easy. I don't remember now who did it, but I do remember him writing something like, "If this doesn't make sense, ask Auspex!"

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Bear is right about the red dirt in some of Oklahoma; it is quite vivid. You can even get t-shirts dyed with the red dirt. It's weird how the soil varies across the state--where I live (and where the specimen was found) in northeastern Oklahoma the dirt is a nice dark brown.

Hey, there's a couple of other Okies here from that area. I was born in Miami, I'm derned if I can remember the name of the other guy. If he'll be so kind as to remind me, I'll add him to my friends list.

So, where are you from? Feel free to IM me if you don't want to give away TMI... :D

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I've lived in Claremore and Tulsa for the last 35 years or so. I've heard there is some good fossil hunting around here, but I wouldn't know a fossil from a concretion from a hole in the ground. It sounds fun though, and I just may take it up one of these days.

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I've lived in Claremore and Tulsa for the last 35 years or so. I've heard there is some good fossil hunting around here, but I wouldn't know a fossil from a concretion from a hole in the ground. It sounds fun though, and I just may take it up one of these days.

Concretions frequently contain fossil material :D

Here's one that has ammonites in it, thanks to a geekier-than-me pal, identified as Cravenoceras fayettevillae:

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That's pretty special to me, because 99% of NWA is covered by early Mississippian layers. That translates to lots of crinoids, brachiopods, bryozoans, and the occasional blastoid or late trilo. Decidedly cool, but after a while one wants to see other critters. Finding coiled shells that once contained cephalopods a half hour from my home rocks!

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