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Darktooth

Wow, that must of been scary! Glad you got away unscathed!

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PODIGGER

Thanks Darktooth and Digit.  Another spot that I have been visiting over the last month has had a resident 4' gator that would climb up on the bank opposite and watch me for a few hours each afternoon.  The guy today scared me out of the river because it was coming up behind me at a steady pace.  It looked like it had no intention of stopping until he had sampled a little two legged snack!

 

I can post some more pictures of the partial mastodon tooth tomorrow, if that's the one your referring to.  It has the one root intact and from the other side it can be seen where the other root broke off.

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caldigger

It was only 4-5 feet, you could take him! ;)

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Darbi
2 hours ago, PODIGGER said:

A few more shovels of gravel went into the sifter when I turned around to see an alligator (4" to 5") swiftly...

 

A proper use of double or single quotation mark is important in determining what standard measurement unit you are using, unless you really meant you got scared of a very tiny alligator no bigger than my palm. :D

 

By the way, nice find!

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digit

Could be worse--he could have said centimeters. :P

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Mike from North Queensland

Not good to hear you got chased out of the water by a lizard but here in Australia I would not even think of sharing the water with one of our salties seeing as they are protected. 

They are not gun shy of people and would consider a regular fossicking spot as a good hunting site.

As far as size goes some aboriginal people used to measure them between the eyes as that was all that was usually visible not the 5 to 6 metres hidden under the water. 

So 4" to 5" would be a reasonable size.

 

Mike

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Ash

The baboon butt is a bit of femur ain’t it?

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Ludwigia

The only worries I have in my neck of the woods are the wild boars when the piglets are young, but that's nothing compared to what you guys have to deal with here. Respect! Good finds too.

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Bobby Rico

Nice finds and glad your ok. You reminded me I need to watch “lake placid” again.  :)

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PODIGGER

Thanks to all for your comments.  It was 4 to 5 FEET - not inches lol! Guess I was a bit tired when I posted that.

 

 @Shellseeker - yes that is the partial mastodon tooth.  I didn't include a picture of the one I thought may be a germ tooth.  I am still looking for examples to make a comparison on the germ tooth.  As far as the gators go, I figure they live there so they have the right of way.

 

@Ash - Thanks for the femur suggestion.  I'll look closer at that.  I will try to get a set of photos of that bone into the ID section soon.

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Uncle Siphuncle

Every detail of this story is enough to fire the fast twitch muscle fibers!

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Bone Daddy

Yup, that would get me out of the water as well. Not a big bull, but big enough to do so damage. Like Ken said, that gator probably won't last long. The curious or aggressive ones tend to get shot and culled. I also hate to see that happen, even when it's a big bull. I think they are beautiful, like a modern-day aquatic dinosaur. Or course, I give them a wide berth, but I enjoy seeing them from a respectful distance.

 

If you want to see gatory, Trout Creek park on the Hillsborough River is the most gator-infested stretch of river I have seen outside of the Myakka. Too many to count at one time. Dozens of visible ones of all sizes, including multiple 10-12 foot beasts. It's a dredged section of the river right before the dam, so it's deep and slow-moving. They congregate there in large numbers in disturbingly-close proximity to Nature's Classroom where schoolkids gather on field trips. Doesn't seem safe to me.

 

Nice finds BTW. That big knobby bone is definitely the "ball tip" of a mastodon or mammoth, or some other megafauna. There aren't too many possible suspects for a bone of that size. Can't wait to see more pics of those teeth and when you get that stuff ID'ed.

 

I'm getting antsy. I've started lobbying my wife to go sometime in the first week of May, if circumstances feel good enough for me to go. I think we are past the worst fear of our Florida hospitals getting overwhelmed on this wave of infections, so I feel better about making a trip. But, when that second wave hits, that might change. So there might be a window for me in between those. I am concerned that the winter portion of our hunting season might get cut short by a renewed wave of infections and lockdowns. Hopefully not.

 

 

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caldigger
9 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

The only worries I have in my neck of the woods are the wild boars when the piglets are young, but that's nothing compared to what you guys have to deal with here. Respect! Good finds too.

The only "real" dangers in my digs are the two legged ones.

Methhead/ tweakers and off road motorcyclists who feel our tailing piles are their own private playland.  Not a day goes by that at least a half dozen motor bikes aren't zipping over and around the dig holes.

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Shellseeker
11 hours ago, Mike from North Queensland said:

As far as size goes some aboriginal people used to measure them between the eyes as that was all that was usually visible not the 5 to 6 metres hidden under the water. 

Mike,

I have heard that your Salties come on the large size and they really like people. I think I would have to find another hobby!!!!

image.png.12d2da0cfd10cffc9ca3ea6358db8fed.png

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digit

I believe every single word. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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PODIGGER

Well Harry, I just happen to have a couple of old police batons laying around.  Now if I can just find a thin cord lanyard I can go right back to my favorite hunting spot!

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PODIGGER

Here are some additional picture of the mastodon tooth -

 

20200424_165359_resized.thumb.jpg.5dd7d6528665bac0e23921b61cc08634.jpg

 

20200424_165412_resized.thumb.jpg.8e7e65db662a7b4737cd897ca53940c1.jpg

 

20200424_165648_resized.thumb.jpg.5a55069f731285ffbd9d0b72de85a108.jpg

 

20200424_165745_resized.thumb.jpg.99a70ebf6a164a1901bf7973ece8edce.jpg

 

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digit

Very cool! More complete than any masto-bits that I've found. :)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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PODIGGER

Thanks Ken.  I believe the lighter spots are areas I damaged with the shovel while digging it out.  That made me more careful later in the day with the other bones - hence a lot of hand digging to free up the others.

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smt126

I think the "butt" shaped bone is either a distal femoral or humeral condyle. 

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PODIGGER

smt126 - thanks for the input. I am leaning toward the femur at this point and getting ready to send photos to Dr Hulbert at the FL Museum of Natural History.

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