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Could Albertosaurinae’s be able to take on Ankylosaurs?


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dinosaur man

I’m just wondering, would an Albertosaurinae be able to manage to attack an Ankylosaur?

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PaleoNoel

I don't know if there's any evidence that albertosaurines would go after armored dinosaurs, and if there have been tyrannosaurid bite marks found on ankylosaurian bones it would probably be even more difficult to distinguish which species made them than it is to confidently identify individual Campanian teeth, along with the fact that they may be from scavenging.

Purely hypothetically I'm sure an experienced adult could bring down a juvenile-subadult, however I think a fully grown zuul, edmontonia, scolosaurus or euplocephalus may be too much for a lone gorgosaurus or albertosaurus. A pack could be a different story, but it is unlikely we will ever know.

Most modern predators will avoid going after prey whose risk may outweigh any reward and I'm confident that would apply to theropods.

While we see in dino docs and movies Tyrannosaurs and other predators going after fully grown prey I think that like most modern predators, they would prefer to go after juveniles as they are much easier to take down.

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dinosaur man
3 hours ago, PaleoNoel said:

I don't know if there's any evidence that albertosaurines would go after armored dinosaurs, and if there have been tyrannosaurid bite marks found on ankylosaurian bones it would probably be even more difficult to distinguish which species made them than it is to confidently identify individual Campanian teeth, along with the fact that they may be from scavenging.

Purely hypothetically I'm sure an experienced adult could bring down a juvenile-subadult, however I think a fully grown zuul, edmontonia, scolosaurus or euplocephalus may be too much for a lone gorgosaurus or albertosaurus. A pack could be a different story, but it is unlikely we will ever know.

Most modern predators will avoid going after prey whose risk may outweigh any reward and I'm confident that would apply to theropods.

While we see in dino docs and movies Tyrannosaurs and other predators going after fully grown prey I think that like most modern predators, they would prefer to go after juveniles as they are much easier to take down.

Thank you for the information!

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