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OutdoorAK

Alaskan Bivalve or Tooth?

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OutdoorAK

Hi everyone! First time posting here. I went out over the weekend to do something outdoors during the quarantine (easy to do in Alaska) and went to a spot known for marine fossils (especially sea lilies) on the Little Nelchina River here in Alaska. I was picking up fossils on an eroded cliff side above the river when I noticed this laying on top. My question is, is it a bivalve or tooth? I don't notice a hinge line or umbo if this is a bivalve, but this may be due to the deteriorated condition and the fact that I am a rookie at this. It appears to be broken in half, with the inside showing black sheeny layering. I appreciate everyone's help on this!

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Pterygotus

Definitely not a tooth. Concretion maybe :)?

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GeschWhat

Wecome to the forum! It looks it could be a cone-in-cone structure, but wait for the experts. :)

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