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A few weeks ago I went on a fossil hunting trip to Albany County. I was hunting in the New Scotland formation which is lower Devonian in age. It was very quick and easy to collect in and the dry dredging technique was quite useful. The rock was a very thin shaly limestone which could break easily but many of the fossils had been silicified, making it easy to pop them out of the rock. I found many different species of brachiopods, some gastropods, lots of corals and large bryozoa and a few trilobites

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Here is an unidentified dalmanitid trilobite free cheek. Based on the size I am thinking it could be Neoprobilium nasutus. 

681B8A81-09DB-4020-85EF-7CE988161ED1.jpeg

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Tidgy's Dad

Love those brachs! :brachiopod:

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@Tidgy's Dad
Thanks!! I’m a huge fan of this formation because of the diversity of brachiopods. There are a lot of interestingly shaped ones. 

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Tidgy's Dad

Indeed. 

I don't know the formation, but you have a spiriferid, possibly Howellella cycloptera, a rhynchonellid that could be Eatonia medialis and an orthid, maybe Platyorthis planoconvexa? 

These are really just guesses from my notes, as I say, I don't know this formation but those may be a starting point. 

If I'm wrong and you know, please tell me what they are. :)

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Fossildude19
9 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Indeed. 

I don't know the formation, but you have a spiriferid, possibly Howellella cycloptera, a rhynchonellid that could be Eatonia medialis and an orthid, maybe Platyorthis planoconvexa? 

These are really just guesses from my notes, as I say, I don't know this formation but those may be a starting point. 

If I'm wrong and you know, please tell me what they are. :)

Looks like you are probably correct on most of them, Adam. Well done sir.  :fistbump:

 

  3199D1.jpg   B38A05D4.jpg

 

  46786C0E-89A4-4DC0-93AD-38510CBB3C49.jpeg.cd560cb1b762741c5aca3c2c048008b5.jpeg  1-D192FA873CF2.jpg

 

 

EDITED TO FIX SPELLING ERRORS. 

 

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Tidgy's Dad
7 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Looks like you are probably correct on most of them, Adam. Well done sir.  :fistbump:

D378721A-3205-4846-8A72-31D6963199D1.jpeg.7daa69e214f945635d6c81ea5f281f52.jpeg  54192B40-7315-423D-972C-93BDB38A05D4.jpeg.e31a6545ac64dda61c249a3c623e679d.jpeg   46786C0E-89A4-4DC0-93AD-38510CBB3C49.jpeg.cd560cb1b762741c5aca3c2c048008b5.jpeg  1-D192FA873CF2.jpg

 

I've no idea on that last possible stroph at all.

And I've never heard of Unicyclus? New genus? 

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I believe the last one is a Costistrophonella headleyana. The first one is a Howellella cycloptera and the second is a Machaeraria formosa. 

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The third one is some sort of orthid brachiopod. 

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Wrangellian

Good report- looks like a successful trip. All these collecting reports this evening have made me start itching to get out, myself.

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Fossildude19
8 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

I've no idea on that last possible stroph at all.

And I've never heard of Unicyclus? New genus? 

Sorry, ... Should have been Uncinulus abruptus.  :duh2::coffee: Thanks for pointing that out, Adam.  

Seems it may be wrong, anyway.  

 

Here are some plates from Wilson's Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York. 

 

picture_2020_5_13_6_53_3_42-vert.jpg  picture_2020_5_13_7_6_43_209.jpg

 

 

 

@Nautiloid

 

Better pictures of your specimen would be helpful - try taking them on a non-reflective surface, and with the views shown here. 

Oblique views are difficult to use to ascertain ID's. 

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FossilNerd

I'm glad that I wasn't the only one who was able to get out recently. Love the diversity of brachs you have! Thanks for sharing. :)

 

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Nice trilo bits! Good job with the ID on the brachs too. Successful trip :brachiopod:

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Beautiful brachiopods - thanks for showing us!

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I find a lot of rhynchonellid brachiopods in the Lower Devonian. I confess, I have difficulty distinguishing some of them, partly because they tend to be distorted, or too weathered and because there are so many species. Congratulations on your finds and thanks for posting them. The Helderberg Plateau is a very interesting place from a geological and paleontological perspective.

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