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laevans320

Is this a Cephlapod?

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laevans320

I live in Maineville, Ohio and have been collecting fossils since childhood. I can easily ID bryozoans, crinoids, brachiopods, trilobites, and cephlapods as I've seen many throughout my life. However, this one has me stumped. It was found in our neighborhood, and I was told by the Ohio Fossils Facebook page that it's a cephlapod. However, no one seems to recognize the rows of circles along the side and top, so they suggested I come here. Does anyone know what this could be? If it's a cephlapod, what kind is it?

IMG_20200606_102042.jpg

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westcoast

Its certainly an orthoconic nautiloid, the rows of circles are possible the bases of  external spines that have not been preserved.

 

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TqB
1 hour ago, westcoast said:

Its certainly an orthoconic nautiloid, the rows of circles are possible the bases of  external spines that have not been preserved.

 

I was wondering about that - do you (or anyone else) know of any spiny orthocones? I've skimmed through the old (1964) nautiloid Treatise and didn't notice any.

 

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Donna Straw

Cool find!

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westcoast
10 minutes ago, TqB said:

I was wondering about that - do you (or anyone else) know of any spiny orthocones? I've skimmed through the old (1964) nautiloid Treatise and didn't notice any.

 

I couldnt find any either, i assumed there must be one somewhere however...:zzzzscratchchin:

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laevans320
5 hours ago, westcoast said:

I couldnt find any either, i assumed there must be one somewhere however...:zzzzscratchchin:

Do you think anyone else here might know what it is or seen anything like it? I'd love to understand what it is and why I've never seen anything like it before when there is an abundance of the other types of fossils found around here. How often do people find fossils that no one has seen before?

5 hours ago, westcoast said:

I couldnt find any either, i assumed there must be one somewhere however...:zzzzscratchchin:

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cngodles

Ordovician correct?

 

I considered a Tentaculitoid, but none in the “Fossils of Ohio” book have the circles or spines. Some are from the Cincinnati area.

 

I paged through the whole book. Nothing looks quite like that. For reference, some Ohio Ordovician Cephalopods include:

 

Manitoulinoceras ultimum 

Treptoceras duseri

Cameroceras inaequabile

 

 

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laevans320

Very interesting. What do you suggest I do at this point? 

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westcoast

I'm now thinking we could be looking at sections across internal cameral deposits. Can you show an image of the 'open' end of the specimen?

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TqB
14 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

For all it's worth, here are a couple of photos of what I have always believed to be a Treptoceras Nautiloid. I found it in the Late Ordovician Georgian Bay Formation in the Etobicoke Creek in the western Toronto area a few years ago and sanded and polished it to bring out the structure of the internal cameral deposits better.

 

N16a.JPG.a7259937d67c75df2e603f972917dd9d.JPG

 

Roger, I think that's pretty convincing as a model of the OPs specimen which I think has to be an orthocone with an off centre siphuncle showing as the circles down the middle.

(A senior synonym of Treptoceras Flower 1942 is Orthonybyoceras Shimizu & Obata 1935, according to the 1964 Treatise. But other actinocerids would fit too I guess.)

 

15 hours ago, westcoast said:

I'm now thinking we could be looking at sections across internal cameral deposits. Can you show an image of the 'open' end of the specimen?

I agree.

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Ludwigia

This post, particularly FossilDAWG's comments on Treptoceras could also be helpful here.

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laevans320
13 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

This post, particularly FossilDAWG's comments on Treptoceras could also be helpful here.

Very helpful! Thank you. Looks like I've found something special in my own backyard.

IMG_20200607_172327.jpg

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laevans320

The "inside" 

IMG_20200607_172341.jpg

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grandpa

So first, a warm Welcome to TFF from Austin, Tx.

 

Second . . .

51 minutes ago, laevans320 said:

Looks like I've found something special in my own backyard.

 

Yes you have!  Time to rent a backhoe!! :egypt:

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Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum. :) 

Very nice find.  

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ZiggieCie

I am glad you came over here, this is a wonderful place to learn about all aspects of fossil hunting from the best.

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laevans320

Very cool. Better late than never?

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YayFossils!
Posted (edited)

Hey, nice find :)

The row of beads down the centre are where the siphuncle has been partially eroded, it might not have had spines. 

Cheers!

Heather

Edited by YayFossils!

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Ruger9a

Beautiful specimen!  Wonderful find! When is the backhoe coming?  LOL

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