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markjw

Joshua Creek Outing and Mosquito picnic

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markjw
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Went to Joshua Creek near Mississauga and got bitten by Mosquitoes! This creek yields its treasures very reluctantly. I looked at hundreds of rocks and brought back only six.

 

One is an 'X' shaped burrow. Another has a bunch of wavy ridges through several layers which I presume are either geological or maybe fossil algae that is new to me. Also got a few 'bumpy' bryozoans, which I have taken to calling 'Parvohallopora' until I can figure out what they really are in Georgian Bay formation.

 

Much of the area was packed with trace fossils...intensely detailed, but boring and with no sign of shells or any fossil life forms. The layer can be observed in place, extending for hundreds of meters, with nothing but burrows and little globs. At one point I found, to my surprise, that the broken shale pieces were pressed against a Queenston formation layer with their detailed surface against the flaky shale. That was surprising and unintuitive to me.

 

I visited my traditional tiny outcrops, one with lampshells and the other with large branching bryozoans (flip side of a layer with large wave ripples).

 

Fossil buddies were: toad, frog, cardinal, and 2 woodpeckers.

1-aFossilBuddy-4.jpg

2-aAncientMArineCreatures40.jpg

3-aIntersectingBurrows50.jpg

4-aBryozoan40.jpg

5-aMArineFossils.jpg

6-aMonticles58.jpg

aRidges.jpg

Edited by markjw
misspelling

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Coco

Is the last pic ripple marks ?

 

Coco

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markjw
6 hours ago, Coco said:

Is the last pic ripple marks ?

 

Coco

I wonder...might be! But they are on multiple layers, so that is odd.

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Monica

Hey Mark!

 

Those bumpy bryozoans are beautiful! :wub:  Perhaps they are indeed Parvohallopora danforthensis because, according to Hessin (2009): "The species Parvohallopora danforthensis is moderately common in the Georgian Bay Formation.  It has a twig-like branching colony that is round in cross-section and with a surface bearing faint monticules.  The zooecia number about 9 in 2 mm and are subcircular in outline." (p. 93)  Perhaps @Tidgy's Dad can come by and have a look-see, too :)

 

Thanks for sharing your lovely finds!

 

Monica

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markjw

Thanks Monica...somehow that Hessin entry escaped me and I was using American sources. The description sounds very close indeed.

 

M

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Tidgy's Dad

Yes, I think Monica is probably correct. :)

Nice bryozoans. 

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