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Manticocerasman

A Cretaceous walk on the beach

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Monica

That Ptychodus tooth is a stunning find - congratulations!!!

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fossilnut

Love the belemnite. Very colorful. What mineral? Nice to be able to be out on the beach. I am envious.

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Nice trip report :) Looks like you guys had a great hunt!!
Absolutely love the Neohibolites, and of course, that beautiful Ptychodus tooth :D

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RJB

The quality of preservation is outstanding!

 

RB

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Trevor

Excellent finds, especially the Ptychodus tooth, and very nice photos. The French coast looks like a beautiful place to collect fossils.; hopefully, you can get out again soon.

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LSCHNELLE

I believe that is a Ptychodus decurrens from the Turonian age Chalk Group member. Great find!

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Emthegem

Wow I loveee the colour on that belemnite, its stunning!

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Manticocerasman
5 hours ago, LSCHNELLE said:

I believe that is a Ptychodus decurrens from the Turonian age Chalk Group member. Great find!

THX,

I'am not familliar with the Ptychodus species. So I  don't know if the European specimens are the same species in the US.

Also the tooth is from the middle Cenomanian ( Acanthoceras rhotomagens  zone ), not the turonian

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LSCHNELLE
7 hours ago, Manticocerasman said:

THX,

I'am not familliar with the Ptychodus species. So I  don't know if the European specimens are the same species in the US.

Also the tooth is from the middle Cenomanian ( Acanthoceras rhotomagens  zone ), not the turonian

Ptychodus decurrens does first occur in the middle Cenomanian extending through the middle Turonian. So, that ID is still a good possibility.  I had just read a paper saying it was most commonly found in France in the Turonian age deposits. Ptychodus decurrens has up to 12 transverse crown ridges on a lower profile crown. At the margin, the ridges bifurcate and branch into numerous finer anastomosing ridges that extend 
to the edge of the crown. Your tooth appears to have those features and it is found in Europe. No other Ptychodus of Cenomanian age have those features. 

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Manticocerasman
2 hours ago, LSCHNELLE said:

Ptychodus decurrens does first occur in the middle Cenomanian extending through the middle Turonian. So, that ID is still a good possibility.  I had just read a paper saying it was most commonly found in France in the Turonian age deposits. Ptychodus decurrens has up to 12 transverse crown ridges on a lower profile crown. At the margin, the ridges bifurcate and branch into numerous finer anastomosing ridges that extend 
to the edge of the crown. Your tooth appears to have those features and it is found in Europe. No other Ptychodus of Cenomanian age have those features. 

Thx for the info it helps a lot :) , althought the mention "commonly found in France" :P those teeth are found from time to time, but they are extremely rare. but mabey other sites in france yield them more frequently.

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Ludwigia

Lovely Ptycodus tooth! @fossilnut The belemnite rostrum is preserved in calcite.

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LSCHNELLE

It is an extremely rare and beautiful find! I was just trying to say they might be more common in the Turonian. Not easy to find.

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