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Ancient Bones

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Ancient Bones

I found these fossils in matrix from the Aurora spoil pile.

What kind of shark teeth are these two specimens, please. Can the coral be ID'd? 

Thanks for looking.

5efb868c1a0bf_ABLC2020Lgsharkth.jpg.9da0572e715ddd80af581ad38519ab3f.jpg

5efb868592041_ABLC2020Smsharkth.jpg.d797ed242fb66c513dc89c9b87c7ffba.jpg

5efb868056aa3_ABLC2020Coral.thumb.jpg.36360eb066ac6ffd97aa2aee4efba688.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad

Bits of the coral Solenastrea bella, maybe? 

  • I found this Informative 1
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The first tooth looks like one of the sand tigers, either Odontaspis or Carcharias. The second tooth is a posterior Lamniforme tooth, possibly a sand tiger or mako. I agree with Solenastrea bella for the coral. The label says Miocene for the coral but it is most likely James City Formation or Chowan River Formation. The reject piles are a mix of Pungo River, Yorktown and younger formations.

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2 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

The first tooth looks like one of the sand tigers, either Odontaspis or Carcharias. The second tooth is a posterior Lamniforme tooth, possibly a sand tiger or mako. I agree with Solenastrea bella for the coral. The label says Miocene for the coral but it is most likely James City Formation or Chowan River Formation. The reject piles are a mix of Pungo River, Yorktown and younger formations.

Thank you very much for the age clarification! I will adjust the labels on Ancient Bones finds.

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4 hours ago, Al Dente said:

The first tooth looks like one of the sand tigers, either Odontaspis or Carcharias. The second tooth is a posterior Lamniforme tooth, possibly a sand tiger or mako. I agree with Solenastrea bella for the coral. The label says Miocene for the coral but it is most likely James City Formation or Chowan River Formation. The reject piles are a mix of Pungo River, Yorktown and younger formations.

 

6 hours ago, old bones said:

@sixgill pete @Al Dente @MarcoSr any opinions? Can the shark teeth be identified enough for a label?

 

I agree with Eric.  I might add that posterior shark teeth can be difficult to ID because the features are usually not as distinctive as other tooth positions.  I think the posterior tooth might also be a great white (C. hastalis).

 

Marco Sr.

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2 hours ago, MarcoSr said:

 

 

I agree with Eric.  I might add that posterior shark teeth can be difficult to ID because the features are usually not as distinctive as other tooth positions.  I think the posterior tooth might also be a great white (C. hastalis).

 

Marco Sr.

Thanks for checking in on this, Marco Sr.. We will just call them 'shark teeth' and amend the age on these.

Julianna

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