Jump to content
Apophis

Having trouble ID’ing this cephalopod

Recommended Posts

Apophis

Howdy folks,

 

Having trouble ID’ing this fossil. Im fairly certain it’s a cephalopod but I haven’t had much luck finding an ID. It’s of unknown origin but was found in Texas. It’s a creek fossil basically. 
 

I believe this is the side but I’m not certain. No finishing work has been done other than rinse and nylon brush.

 

 

56DEC8E8-CA51-4850-A43B-92E8D206F530.jpeg.244d771c88b992e2c1b016f78d800fb0.jpeg

 

Opposite side with view of back

13419E6D-66DE-49F1-A16D-7DD5A324E9B2.thumb.jpeg.f398eb463be747711cf6b66269a592a3.jpeg
 

Bottom?

1D84C320-77FC-4E93-8E6B-C08E7D78F2FB.thumb.jpeg.0c4d4fc728df3514bbe9f91073bc0bec.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

Sorry. I can't say just what this is, but I'm fairly certain it's not a cephalopod fossil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

What features are you seeing that lead you to believe this is a cephalopod? 

 

I am not seeing any sutures or whorls that would indicate any kind of ammonite. 

Also not seeing any chambers or camerae that would indicate an orthocone cephalopod.  :unsure: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Apophis

Thank for the comment and feedback. Clearly I jumped the gun on posting this considering it’s not prepped, it’s likely oriented wrong, has no visible sutures or features, and it’s the most complex fossil I have. *facepalm*
 

Im going to shelf this one and come back to it later. I actually have two of these and possibly a smaller third. The other one is a lighter color, has visible sutures, and has some internals exposed due to damage / weathering. I suspect they are heteramorphs but I’ve never seen one agatized. All the ones I’ve found pictures of are internal casts. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

I don't know what can be "prepped" in this piece.  :headscratch:

I'm not seeing the typical sedimentary rock-/limestone/shale/sandstone. 

And while some fossils can be agatized or geodized, they are usually still recognizable as fossils. 

This is looking to me like a metamorphic rock, and while they can have fossils in them, again, they are usually somewhat recognizable.  :unsure: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

I'm in agreement. I'm just not seeing anything suggesting fossil here. With no visible features to suggest otherwise, I would not class this as a "complex" fossil; Occam's Razor would make the cut at non-fossil rock, possibly metamorphic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockwood

I can see features that would correspond to those of a distorted cephalopod. The problem is that the pieces don't make up the right picture for the puzzle to represent one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ClearLake

I’m also not seeing anything that screams fossil in these pictures. Looks like a rock to me. Texas is a big place, knowing where it came from could help narrow down rock types too (as could whacking it with a rock hammer). Metamorphic rocks are not that common in many parts of the state. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Apophis

To clarify what I mean by prep, it needs wet sanding to smooth out and see what features, if any, are there. Now why on earth would I do that? Mr O’s famous razor would dictate almost immediate dismissal of this... unless there some other data to suggest something is off, an anomaly, worth exploring. Ill get into that later as it deserves a full post of its own. 
 

As far as the rock itself, it’s agate / chalcedony / microcrystalline quartz. It’s river gravel from Houston Texas. It’s full of wierdness... 

 

Here is a portion of it exposed. Again, appreciate the feedback. 06140C5B-1B2A-4EEA-999A-6B711F350C2F.thumb.jpeg.6af266bfa3b7926bd3fdce61e34c6633.jpeg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
caterpillar

Sorry but I don't see any fossil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kane

Still not seeing any fossil in this.

The data you will at some point reveal would have to be presenting something fairly extraordinary for this to be a cephalopod fossil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×