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MDagnan7

Need help with ID please...

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MDagnan7

I’m in the twilight zone apparently...I know how ridiculous this seems, but the only thing I can find that remotely seems to match this thing for size and shape is titanaboa.   I’m open to other suggestions.  This was in my back yard in Fort Worth, Texas...relatively shallow - about a foot to the top of it. We are in a rocky area and are within 30 ft of the highest elevation in the county, about 150 ft above the average for the city.  I can’t find a tape measure to put next to it, but measured with my iPhone and it’s 29” long, 13” wide, and about 9” at the highest point. Seems to weigh in the 80-100 lb range. It looks like  were other At least 2 other snakes on top of it that you can make out on the top left of it, but pieces of them have broken off as well as some of the main specimen. The underbelly is in excellent condition...it seems clearly show “snakeskin”. It wouldn’t let me attach more pictures, but on the back you can clearly see vertebrae at almost the center position and what seems to be some other type of nerve endings above that. There are literally hundreds, maybe thousands of pieces in the immediate area from ground level down ranging from quarter sized up to basketball sized with most between golf ball and baseball. I’ve been digging slowly for 3 days with no end in sight. Many of them are hard to specifically identify but seem to almost all meet criteria for fossil and not rock. Please help...

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FranzBernhard

Welcome to TFF from Austria!
Sorry, I am not seeing a fossil here. It looks like some sort of weathered limestone or concretion.

You are giving a rather exact location (thanks!), so some local folks (many members from Texas here on TFF) can give you a more specific identification (age etc.).

Franz Bernhard

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Fossildude19

Weathered limestone. Not a fossil, unfortunately.  :( 

I cannot "clearly see" any kind of "snakeskin".   

 

Creatures do not generally fossilize completely.

Not sure what you mean by "nerve endings", but snakes usually fossilize as bones, rather than with any flesh or skin still intact.  :headscratch:

 

You can upload 4 mb worth of images per post. If you get an error message, just refresh your browser. 

You can add more photos via add reply box at the bottom of the page. 

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Creek - Don

I saw those sort of rocks at the Benbrook lake in Fort Worth.  They are Kiamichi Cretaceous rocks containing lots of invertebrate fossils, but unfortunately I don't see any fossils either. 

 

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BobWill

Welcome to the forum from Cooke County. I agree with the others on your find. You should also keep in mind that this area will produce mostly marine fossils with occasional exceptions.  I have never heard of any snake fossils from here and very large snakes did not appear until much later than the time of local deposits. If you google snake fossil images you will see what to expect if you ever find one.

 

On the bright side you are in fossil heaven! If you keep looking you will surely find lots of marine invertebrates and even the occasional shark tooth in many of the formations in North Central Texas.

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