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Kpitch

Hi!

A recent walk in the woods resulted in the discovery of this nautiloid. I found it in Wilson County, TN which is Ordovician. I am super excited about this because we found it in the woods on the property where I grew up, which means I probably walked past it a million times, and it's 3D so it shows the the siphuncle, and the outside of the phragmocone. We did not have anything to measure it with but I would estimate it to be about 12cm (5in).

 

So my questions are these: I think first verify what I think this is and what I see as I am new to this.

I have looked around the internet for genus/species of Orthoceras found in TN, but can't find anything, does anyone know?

The fossil is covered with moss, what is the best way to clean it without breaking anything (once we drag this monster rock out of the woods and to the house)?

Thank you so much for opinion/advice/help!

 

nautiloid1.JPG.f0ae5f07bf73e69c4f20c5b4c8a1f126.JPGnautiloid3.thumb.JPG.9e32a10bf29d8c55906557bec1813e74.JPGnautiloid4.thumb.JPG.421eaefcd855f9d9d6b23f78015f1a12.JPG

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Misha
1 hour ago, Ludwigia said:

Scratch and scrub off as much of the moss that you possibly can and then lay it in a 10-25% solution of household bleach and rinse it thoroughly when it's done its job.

Is bleach safe to use with fossils?

I have never used it for this purpose but I do know from bone collecting that it can be detrimental to the structure of bone, obviously, these are very different but still, I feel like bleach may be a bit too strong of a chemical for something like this.

I generally use Hydrogen Peroxide for such applications

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Ludwigia
1 minute ago, Misha said:

Is bleach safe to use with fossils?

I have never used it for this purpose but I do know from bone collecting that it can be detrimental to the structure of bone, obviously, these are very different but still, I feel like bleach may be a bit too strong of a chemical for something like this.

I generally use Hydrogen Peroxide for such applications

My experience has shown me that in the case of this strongly mineralized nautiloid it would work.

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ClearLake

Bleach should be fine for a fossil like this. But I am a big advocate of hydrogen peroxide for modern bone and not bleach. 

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FossilDAWG

The large siphuncle and thickened septa are very suggestive of the genus Actinoceras.  If you google that name I'm sure you will find images very similar to your specimen.

 

The was the fossil is eroding free of the limestone matrix suggests it has been silicified.  You could try to clean it, or even free it from the rock using dilute hydrochloric acid (sold as muriatic acid in the paint department at hardware and home supply stores).  If you decide to try that be sure to exercise all safety precautions, such as gloves, goggles, protective clothing, and working in a very well ventilated space or outdoors.  Be sure to dilute the acid at least 4-5X with water.  After etching, be sure to rinse several (many) times in water.

 

That being said, I think it would be best to just clean the moss and dirt off and leave it as is.  Specimens often become quite fragile after acid etching.  I think it looks good on the rock as it is, although you could try to reduce the size of the rock some.

 

Don

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grandpa

For removing algae, does anyone have any experience with the commercial products made for removing algae from e.g., concrete? 

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minnbuckeye
18 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

Scratch and scrub off as much of the moss that you possibly can

 

I kinda like the combo of moss and worn cephalopod. So don't eliminate leaving it as is!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Kpitch
On 8/5/2020 at 12:17 PM, Fossildude19 said:

These are the Formations that outcrop in Wilson County. 

 

This is a website about Tennessee Fossils.

 

Wilson county has mainly Ordovician aged outcrops, with a few Mississippian areas in the north-western side of the county. 

From a quick search, it looks like the possibilities may be  Actinoceras sp.  or Michelinoceras sp.

geology_geologic-map-lg.jpg

EDIT: Here is a paper on Upper Ordovician Cephalopods from nearby states. 

 

 

Thank you for this information!

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FossilDAWG
On 8/5/2020 at 12:17 PM, Fossildude19 said:

This is a website about Tennessee Fossils.

 

Wilson county has mainly Ordovician aged outcrops, with a few Mississippian areas in the north-western side of the county. 

From a quick search, it looks like the possibilities may be  Actinoceras sp.  or Michelinoceras sp.

You can exclude Michelinoceras, as the siphuncle of that genus is very different.  It is smaller, either straight or with a bead-like shape (one "bead" in each chamber or camera), and is positioned in the center of the septa.

 

Don

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GeschWhat
On 8/6/2020 at 6:42 AM, minnbuckeye said:

 

I kinda like the combo of moss and worn cephalopod. So don't eliminate leaving it as is!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I like the combo as well!

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