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Restoration


PetrosTrilobite

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PetrosTrilobite

I don't know if I am the only one that i hate restoration on the fossils. I love natural and original specimens. I prefer a tooth 80-90% complete from a tooth with restoration. Also, i prefer a B grade tooth with no repair, from a A grade repaired tooth.

You?

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I don't mind some restoration if it is clearly indicated. If it is done well, it adds to the aesthetics of the piece. If it is a piece of scientific significance, absolutely not. Restoration should not be done on species that are yet to be formally described or for which the holotype is incomplete.

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I agree, I don't mind if a piece is glued back together but I will not buy a fossil with restoration nor will I restore any of my fossils, even if damaged, I like the original more.

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EscarpmentMary

I like leaving them alone because I’m fearful of changing their structure, I may make a biased change unknowingly. I look at them everyday and on some I will notice some small detail which adds to my understanding and some new speculation.

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I live in Morocco. 

Restoration is almost inevitable. 

But better than fabrication. 

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Brett Breakin' Rocks

I have a few shark teeth that have an unusual color and size that I will eventually get restored. Some of that work, if it is done well, I think adds to the visual beauty of the piece and tells its own story. This is an example I have showed before of exceptional work. It is an art form and a craft in and of itself.

 

Image Credit: Instagram User - naturesrelix

Instagram_Restoration_naturesrelix_01.thumb.jpg.6b8a12c8392c28a1a79e0033dd9f3361.jpgInstagram_Restoration_naturesrelix_02.thumb.jpg.5bc41c8651718e803db4484a39f9e7a5.jpgInstagram_Restoration_naturesrelix_03.thumb.jpg.2707800abdc0a9db4d9710d7e09b72b3.jpg

 

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My view of restoration and repair are night and day.

 

I don't like restorations as well and would prefer to buy fossils with as little restoration as possible. I don't mind it as much if it's done for stability purposes. Composite restorations I feel are the worst, especially if it goes through multiple hands and the information gets blurry.

 

Repairs on the other hand, I'm perfectly fine with, if not completely indifferent to them. If I can get a complete tooth for much cheaper that is repaired, or better yet, unrepaired and still broken in pieces, I would prefer to buy it than a unbroken complete tooth. I would go with whichever is more complete, aka "higher grade" regardless of cracks or breaks.

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I have seen some amazing restoration been carried out to fossil on this Forum as above,  fossil I would be happy to own. Other members work like @Ludwigia ammonites work. 

 

saying that I also I have some partial ammonites a are a bit gnarly   that I love the look of more than some of the complete one of the same sp . It is definitely a personal choice but it is done well and make a good show piece I say yes it a good thing. Cheers Bobby 

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I find that it's a matter of personal taste for hobby collectors. I do a lot of restoration work for customers who want that and also on my own finds if I feel like it, but like Bobby has just said, sometimes the gnarly ones are interesting enough to leave as is. The important thing for me is that the restored areas are either visible or at least noted in the data. The thing is, almost all fossils don't retain their original color or substance anyway. A natural mold or cast is a complete restoration in a sense so one could argue that a bit of restoration brings the fossil back closer to its original appearance.

It's quite a different case for those interested in the scientific value, particularly paleontologists, who mostly want to study the original as found, although one does see a lot of restored skeletons on display in museums.

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1 hour ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

Restoration is like make-up. Some need it, some don't.

A lovely Bonmot!

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I love restorations, they can keep otherwise expensive specimens budget friendly or they can recreate certain fossils you'd never have a chance to own naturally whole and perfect. They also give some specimens a 'museum' feel as many on display specimens in many museums have alot of restoration. Also professional restoration and artistry can truely transform and bring back a specimen to its former glory such as the megalodon tooth pictured above. I get the whole quality arguement, if you can afford to buy or find that particular specimen then definately go for it first. Otherwise most of all its a personal preference thing so theres no need to harshly bash or discount restored specimens, they still have some original part of the original animal, and as long as that is part of it, owning a part of an amazing prehistoric animal is the number one factor at least to me. Some of the most amazing specimens in my collection are restored and are pieces the average person would only ever dream of owning or being able to afford, so to even have them as restored pieces is truely a blessing.

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To me any repair as long as it isn't sloppy is no issue. As far as restoration it depends on the amount and the type of fossil. On a common Moroccan trilo, no I wouldn't want a restored piece. But you have to consider what's on the market. Take for example Russian trilobites, restoration is extremely common. From what I've seen most of the ones without at least some restoration or repair are A: entirely perfect or B: not high enough quality to be worth the time. Would you rather break the bank on the rare perfect piece, get a piece with only 70% of the shell intact, or buy your standard 5%-10%  restoration?

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