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Mr.Baker

Does anyone know if it’s possible for the meat; the edible part, of an oyster to be fossilised?

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Kane

I've not seen that, but I would think that the odds do not favour soft tissue preservation in most cases outside what are known as Lagerstatte-Konservat sites. 

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Mr.Baker

Thanks Kane,

I’ll post a photo of what I’ve found and explain why I think it could be. I’ve explained it to a highly qualified geologist and she says it’s not impossible. Got to go,

back later...

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Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum.  :)      

 

"Not impossible" is half a step away from "Probably not".  :unsure: 

As Kane stated, it would require extremely precise conditions for that to happen. 

 

I look forward to seeing your pictures. :popcorn:

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Mr.Baker

Cheers Tim... photos coming soon.

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Mr.Baker

It came from underground in a lead / zinc mine where the host rock is limestone. It was full of shells and coral etc. It came from a place called the Lennard shelf in nw west Australia 

07E6DAEA-E333-475F-925D-5DAFFB5E35F0.jpeg

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Mr.Baker

The black line is there to indicate the shell

085D400F-2B9D-4304-B44A-8E12952BE127.jpeg

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Mr.Baker

The other side of the rock shows congromonate limestone?

305B68CB-E21B-4F54-91C1-6440824C5CC4.jpeg

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Mr.Baker

Here you can see the whole thing is separate from what it’s sitting on...

hope these photos and information help

B957E70E-B9C9-455E-93B8-B8029302BC7D.jpeg

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Kane

Not seeing any fossil here, but certainly geologic processes.

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Fossildude19

Looks concretionary in origin, to me.  

I don't believe it is a fossil, though. 

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Mr.Baker

The geologist said that if the meat inside the shell was heated up over a period of time to where it was ‘cooked’, and ended up being somewhat harder than just a soft, wet oyster it may happen, but a lot of stars would have to align for it to happen. Possible...

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JohnJ

@Mr.Baker

Do you have images of any other shells and coral from the location?

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Mr.Baker

If you google the anatomy of a oyster and have a look, they look similar...

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Mr.Baker

JohnJ yes I do but not with me. And it will be a while before I can get to them...

 

JohnJ, sorry no more photos but plenty of samples. Will post when I can

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Kane

In terms of the scientific method and falsification, could you enumerate the reasons this may not be a fossil?

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Mr.Baker

@Kane that’s sort of what I’m trying to find out. I’m not educated in the field of fossils or geology but like I said in my first post, is it “possible” for the meat to become fossilized?

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Fossildude19

Just to add to what FossilNerd has said, specifically, you should look into taphonomy, (the branch of paleontology that deals with the processes of fossilization.)

Search taphonomy and the location name. 

 

Also look into Lagerstatte.  If soft tissues preservation is going to happen, it won't generally happen on just one fossil in the area. It will happen in a specific area to many fossils. 

So unless you have a number of soft body preservation examples, it would be a longshot that this is the case with your item.

 

Possible, ... conceivably.  But highly or extremely unlikely.  ;) 

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Mr.Baker

@FossilNerd 

@Fossildude19

thanks for your help. Your information was great... I’ll keep pursuing it though to find out what it actually is,

cheers...

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curiousfinds

I have a fossilized snail, so yes, soft tissue can fossilized under the right circumstances,  ie, salt water, sand, mud.

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Coco
May we see a picture of your fossilized snail ? It’s certainly the shell that is fossilized and nothing else. I have been collecting shells for years and I have never found a snail with the soft parts preserved !
 
Coco

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Ludwigia
3 hours ago, curiousfinds said:

I have a fossilized snail, so yes, soft tissue can fossilized under the right circumstances,  ie, salt water, sand, mud.

A fossil is generally defined as something at least 10,000 years old. How old is your snail?

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