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Zenmaster6

Agatized Coral? Nut? Seed?

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Zenmaster6

Found in landscaping bed in south Texas

I think it could be a solitary coral. 

 

 

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20200919_095038.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad

Me too. :)

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Rockwood

Someone good with septal insertion patterns should be able it pin it down well.

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Zenmaster6
3 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Someone good with septal insertion patterns should be able it pin it down well.

And just who might that be? 

 

(can we tag them?):Jumping:

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Rockwood

Not sure, I was hoping for volunteers. :)

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fifbrindacier

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Rockwood

A volunteer to tag will do just fine. :)

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Zenmaster6
14 hours ago, Rockwood said:

A volunteer to tag will do just fine. :)

Hey, youre about to hit 3000!

Congrats on being here so long! :yay-smiley-1:

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Rockwood

Well, I'll go one closer and speculate that this is on the upper side of the Permian, making it a scleractinian coral.

It sometimes help in getting the natives restless. (especially if it's wrong ;))

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fifbrindacier

Also, maybe photos with your piece dry would help.

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HansTheLoser

Merci ma chère amie pour la invitation.

 

It is indeed a coral, but rather worn out to be able to say anything.

 

BTW, Scleractinian-like corals were occasionally indicated in the Paleozoic (papers by Scrutton and Ezaki). We know that scleractinian corals evolved from anemones, but with success finally in the mid Triassic.

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fifbrindacier
4 minutes ago, HansTheLoser said:

Merci ma chère amie pour la invitation.

 

It is indeed a coral, but rather worn out to be able to say anything.

 

BTW, Scleractinian-like corals were occasionally indicated in the Paleozoic (papers by Scrutton and Ezaki). We know that scleractinian corals evolved from anemones, but with success finally in the mid Triassic.

Je t'en prie.:)

I've learned tonight that scleractinians evolved from anemones.

We learn everyday on that wonderful forum.

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oyo
3 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Well, I'll go one closer and speculate that this is on the upper side of the Permian, making it a scleractinian coral.

It sometimes help in getting the natives restless. (especially if it's wrong ;))

I volunteer.
Perhaps he will look at the geological chart of the landscaping bed to see if we can get any information about the specimen's stratigraphy from there. This would certainly help us. Thus we would not have to speculate and the natives would be calm. :cool07:

You make me envy. To catch corals I have to go into a ravine and you collect them in the garden.

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fifbrindacier

Hi Oyo, thank you for your help.

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Rockwood

Is that possibly a worm tube obscuring the center as shown in the last photo ?

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oyo

 

2 hours ago, fifbrindacier said:

Hi Oyo, thank you for your help.

Hi, not at all.

1 hour ago, Rockwood said:

Is that possibly a worm tube obscuring the center as shown in the last photo ?

 

Yes, there is something there but I don't know what it´s.

He could try to remove it by sanding that area until whatever is there is gone. Surely, it seems to be well preserved, it would show the central area of the coral.

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Rockwood
1 hour ago, oyo said:

He could try to remove it by sanding that area until whatever is there is gone. Surely, it seems to be well preserved, it would show the central area of the coral.

Who cares what kind of coral it is ? What is the other thing ?

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oyo
8 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Who cares what kind of coral it is ? What is the other thing ?

Who cares what the other thing it is?. Personally it seems to me that it is just a piece of stuff stuck to a coral, I hadn't even noticed it. But keep in mind that nobody´s perfect, neither am I.

I´m aware that almost no one is interested in corals, just a select group of people who are on another level. Make no mistake, I did not say higher level I said another level. Unspecific.:cool07:

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Rockwood

Diversity of interest is a wonderful thing. :thumbsu:

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Zenmaster6

@Rockwood @oyo @fifbrindacier @HansTheLoser

 

Hopefully this helps. In real life the tube in the center looks very well preserved.

 

I am finding loads of petrified wood so its gotta be somewhat near shore. cant be pre triassic. I wanna say cretaceous as the majority of sediment in Texas seems to be cretaceous. I live in Corpus Christi *pleistocene wash*  though, which is why I find landscaping rocks. 

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Rockwood

I have to change my opinion. I now think the tube is actually remnant of dissepiment in a rugose horn coral. The indication also being that it was bilateral (to the degree that is typical).

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oyo
On 21/9/2020 at 10:22 AM, Rockwood said:

Diversity of interest is a wonderful thing. :thumbsu:

Diversity of opinion also is a wonderful thing.

The specimen may be somewhat older than Pleistocene but less than what Mr Rockwood proposes. Scleractinia for me.
One question to the owner: height of the specimen and diameter of the chalice?, in mms. please. I apologize for not being familiar with the size of the coins.

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fifbrindacier

I agree, the coins are not at all a good scale. Centimeters or inches are better. 1inch = 2.5 cm.

The fingers of our friend give us an approximative idea of its size, but for the determination of a coral a precise measurement is needed.

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