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Just got back from the fossil fair at Sanford Civic Center in central Florida, had a great time and brought back some great specimens. There's quite a variety here, but I have quite specific geographic/geological data for each piece, so I'm excited for some opinions. After some careful deliberation, I've decided to make separate posts for each specimen, as I want to thoroughly inspect each piece rather than half-haphazardly glance over all of them. The tag with this fossil reads exactly: "Osteoborus cyonoides Late Miocene- "Hemphillian Ogallala Group Hemphill Co. Texas 'Coffee Ranch Fauna'" Apparently Osteoborus is a synonymous taxon for Borophagus. How does the tag hold up? Thank you very much for your time, much appreciated. NOTE: ruler is in cm, this tooth is quite small.

 

 

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Harry Pristis

Here's my example.  As you can see, your tooth is not a carnassial.  It is a premolar four (p4).  Still, a nice specimen for what it is.

 

borophaguslitteralis.jpg.861859aeed62fdf19a44acc46c59ab65.jpg

   This is a jaw from a dog with specialized teeth for crushing bones. Notice how the two large teeth (premolar 4 and molar 1) are crowded together to make a virtual single crushing platform. In this adaptation, the p4 is enlarged to match the size of the m1, while the other premolars and molars are of unremarkable size.

   This species (recently revised) represents a cluster of widespread, successful species that flourished in the Miocene, though no representative survived into the Pleistocene.

 

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1 hour ago, Harry Pristis said:

Here's my example.  As you can see, your tooth is not a carnassial.  It is a premolar four (p4).  Still, a nice specimen for what it is.

 

borophaguslitteralis.jpg.861859aeed62fdf19a44acc46c59ab65.jpg

   This is a jaw from a dog with specialized teeth for crushing bones. Notice how the two large teeth (premolar 4 and molar 1) are crowded together to make a virtual single crushing platform. In this adaptation, the p4 is enlarged to match the size of the m1, while the other premolars and molars are of unremarkable size.

   This species (recently revised) represents a cluster of widespread, successful species that flourished in the Miocene, though no representative survived into the Pleistocene.

 

Thanks for the ID, doesn't disappoint me much that it's not the carnassial, was looking for a bone crushing dog fossil, glad it matched; I have all 3 dog groups now. Canid evolution is one of my favorite areas in paleontology, so to own a tooth of one of these extinct dog groups I read about is fantastic. Again, thanks.

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