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SharkySarah

Help needed

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SharkySarah

I’m currently looking on fossil guy but I’m stumped. Ideas?

5955D355-8C65-44C5-ADB5-2FAAF6F26B67.jpeg

6FFE6B65-0288-4C32-BA4E-8D93CBCB4B5E.jpeg

 

 

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SharkySarah

@will stevenson thank you so much!!!! That actually really helps me a lot!!!

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will stevenson
1 minute ago, SharkySarah said:

@will stevenson thank you so much!!!! That actually really helps me a lot!!!

no problem;)

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will stevenson
11 hours ago, sixgill pete said:

I disagree with this tooth being Carcharhinus brachyurus. I believe it is a lower carcharhinus, possibly C. obscurus. But that is speculation on my part.

 

Carcharhinids are extremely difficult to I.D. from single isolated teeth as many of the different species (35? extant and 8 extinct)  have teeth so similar it is almost impossible to differentiate them. Especially the lower teeth. 

 

1 hour ago, hemipristis said:

Are those from fossil guy?  I believe his IDs are mistaken. Those 'brachyurous' teeth look more like C. perezii.  I'd recommend elasmo.com, or the Lee Creek Vol. III, which is available free online.

 

Below: C. brachyurus.

 

c_brachy-fem-web.jpg

 

Below: C. falciformis vs. C. perezii

 

 

ds1300z15n52-web.jpg

Ok guys I was probably wrong, I was just going off my little understanding from fossil guy, if his ID’s were wrong then mine are too:) if they’re wrong, shouldn’t somebody tell him? 

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hemipristis
17 hours ago, Shellseeker said:

Sarah,

I have been hunting Bone Valley Florida for more than 10years, some years 4 times a week, 9 months a year. A hunting friend back 7-8 years ago always counted the number of small shark teeth he found on a single trip.  His record was 867 teeth found on a single trip.

I have found hundreds of thousands if not millions of small shark teeth, 20% of which look like your example.

I can not tell the difference between a Caribbean reef shark, a silky, a bull or dusky shark tooth. They all look the same to a novice eye.

@sixgill pete summarized perfectly. 

"extremely difficult"  means that even the experts can be wrong.

So what is a person to do , who is not an expert, does not care to take the time to become one ?

1) Accept, like I do, that the teeth are Carcharhinids without lower specificity,  or

2) Go to elasmo.com and become an expert yourself on variations on Carcharhinids teeth (this may take some time)  or

3) Look for multiple experts, some of whom are likely to disagree.

 

Welcome to the Fossil Forum.   Jack

well said

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