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cmwilson101

Florida Fossil Bivalve Resources?

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cmwilson101

Greetings all.  I moved to Amelia Island, Florida in 2018 and fell in love with the fossil pectens I found on the beach.  I find shark teeth too, but usually by accident as I'm looking for fossil shells. At first I thought they were Chesapecten jeffersonius but realized that they are a bunch of different species.  I have bought every book and studied every blurry scanned PDF of a good old scientific paper, but I just haven't been able to find a definitive source on how to ID them.  Does anyone know a good Chesepecten ID resource?  It'd be really awesome to learn more about how I can ID them.  I added a picture of the 17 that I found last Saturday on the grid (each square is an inch) as well as some of my favorites (on the wood tray).   I think I have chesapecten middlesexensis bayshoreensis, Chesapecten middlesexensis hunterae, Carolinapecten murdockensis parawatsonensis, Chesapecten quinarius.   I can do better photos of them if anyone is interested.  These were all beach finds on Amelia Island which I think (still a newbie) is the Orange Bluff Unit, maybe Miocene.  

 

Thanks in advance for any info or pointing me to any resources.  Cheers, Cheryl 

IMG_5140 (2).jpg

IMG_5271 (2).jpg

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minnbuckeye

 Does anyone know a good Chesepecten ID resource?   @MikeR, who is better than a book, may have suggestions both for IDs and books. His gallery images may be of great help. By the way, very artistic photos! 

 

Mike

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Shellseeker

We are fortunate to have one of the Fossil Seashell experts in the world in @MikeR and he has done extensive work on Florida Bivales and Gastropods. He has created an excellent collection of his finds on TFF, and would be the goto person on what Florida research documents and books would best fit your needs.

 

I would start by searching for a few of the ones you have identified in Member Collections. 

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minnbuckeye

Jack, beat you to it!!!!!!

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Thomas.Dodson

The following paper has a lot of information regarding Chesapecten morphology and identification. It seems they're highly variable but most are limited to specific stratigraphic units as chronospecies.

 

https://scholarworks.wm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1438&context=honorstheses

 

 

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cmwilson101
1 hour ago, Thomas.Dodson said:

The following paper has a lot of information regarding Chesapecten morphology and identification. It seems they're highly variable but most are limited to specific stratigraphic units as chronospecies.

 

https://scholarworks.wm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1438&context=honorstheses

 

 

Thomas.Dodson, thank you so much for this link!  Really excellent paper and the conclusion sums up the difficulty I am having:  The morphological analysis 44 demonstrated that there is at least as much variation within species and samples as there is between groups, which means that C. middlesexensis and C. jeffersonius cannot be distinguished based on landmarks describing morphological shape. However, with a character analysis, almost all species can be differentiated from the others based on a combination of traits.   

 

So there is hope, since the paper identifies those traits.      

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cmwilson101
2 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

 Does anyone know a good Chesepecten ID resource?   @MikeR, who is better than a book, may have suggestions both for IDs and books. His gallery images may be of great help. By the way, very artistic photos! 

 

Mike

Thank you for the tips!  I always wash & photograph & record my findings after each beachcombing trip and thought the photos might as well look good.  I'll work on getting some better photos though, I read the post about providing them when asking for IDs.  

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cmwilson101
2 hours ago, Shellseeker said:

I would start by searching for a few of the ones you have identified in Member Collections. 

Thank you for the response, and good idea re searching the forum to verify my IDs.  This is so exciting, glad I found the forum and that you're all so willing to share info!  

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minnbuckeye

When MikeRs highlighted in blue, as in Shellseekers response, he will be notified of your post and hopefully respond with some information. For your information, if I hit @ and then your name, you should receive notice.       @cmwilson101

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cmwilson101
On 11/1/2020 at 4:12 PM, MikeR said:

Hoo boy!  This is not going to be easy.  If they are washed onto an Atlantic side beach, then it is difficult to say where they might originate as Roger Portell has reported SMR Pinecrest shells shipped for oyster beds and fill as far north as South Carolina.  Let's however assume they are from local dredging activities as Chesapecten can be found in dredge from tidal creeks in nearby Glynn County, Georgia.  I find that Chesapecten are always easier to identify with their associated molluscan fauna.  Places such as the James River in Virginia which exposes different formations at multiple sites all with their specific species of Chesapecten mixed along the shore can make identification challenging.

Ward and Blackwelder's original publication on Chesapecten is probably the best resource.  LINK

 

Mike

Hello Mike, Thank you so much for taking the time to assist.   @minnbuckeye was right, you're better than a book!  A tour guide, too.  I am very excited to investigate the resources you've provided.     

 

I have quite a bit of research to do now, but I can provide some context on origin:  I only find them on the North and North East coast of the island.  Cumberland Sound is dredged fairly often because there is a submarine base upstream.  I find more fossils after dredging, a Nor'easter, and King tides.   Locals say that they used to find megalodon teeth fairly often.  

 

I've found two of those flat scallops; they look like relatives of Pecten Vogdesi to me.  

 

Thanks very much for all the info.   Cheers, Cheryl

 

And it's great to find others that are interested in mollusks too is.   

Mystery Mollusk back.jpg

Mystery Mollusk front.jpg

Mystery Mollusk top.jpg

Amelia and Cumberland Islands.jpg

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MikeR

Sorry for taking so long in getting back on this.  Work gets in the way as usual.  The laminated nature of the shell threw me at first, however the side profile indicates a top valve of a true pecten, more than likely Euvola hemicyclicusE. vogdesi is an Eastern Pacific species.

 

Mike

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