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Phevo

Thanks for another great trip report, Interresting to see quarrys in a place I will probably never go to. 

 

Without knowing what they produce there (bricks, tiles?) it's hard to know what the spreadout spoil piles are, but they could be overburden piles, they are after a certain type of clay and have to remove overburden first and pile it on top of previously excavated areas, might also explain why some people have said it was great a great site earlyer

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Kane

Seconded!

As always, your photo-journaling of trips is like we are along for the journey. And you did all the hard surface scanning to spare our eyes. :P 

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Tidgy's Dad

Thirded! 

Great report.

Interesting to see the scaphopods being so abundant there. :)

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RuMert

Thanks for the kind words!

1 hour ago, Phevo said:

have to remove overburden first and pile it on top of previously excavated areas

Well, why not? I've only seen flooded or "recultivated" quarries before and got used to big pits

1 hour ago, Kane said:

you did all the hard surface scanning to spare our eyes

A sort of underwater telescope would be useful there, but for surface collecting:D

 

17 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Interesting to see the scaphopods being so abundant there

Yep, it could mean the layer is different from the point of view of conditions and probably geologic period. It's vaguely the same geologic setting in all the aforementioned quarries (nobody knows exactly as there are too few ammos and gastropods are too slow-evolving to distinguish). But actually there can be several different ammonite zones with different faunas. Too little research in this field so far

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FranzBernhard

Thanks for taking us along again, @RuMert!

 

The small gastros and bivalves are so fresh, so well preserved, so, well - so Cenozoic-looking.

Could there be younger sediments above the Jurassic ones in this area?

 

Franz Bernhard

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RuMert

Thank you, @FranzBernhard

Oxfordian clay magic:D The shells are so well preserved some people lose their mind and can think about nothing but those gastropods (there are lots of rare beauties I have yet to find and show you). Unfortunately the magic concerns only small shells of more "ordinary" mollusks

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Coco

Hi,

 

I’m very surprised at the quality of your Mesozoic shells :wub: :wub: They look like Cenozoic ! I’m really looking forward to seeing more, if you have more in your collection !
 
Coco

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RuMert

Merci, Coco! Not too many so far, I've shown all I have, looking forward to collecting more in spring

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fossilizator

Безымянный-7.jpg

 

This is awesome... small) but awesome!

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RuMert

Yep:) Tornatellaea frearsiana

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Coco

I like Acteonidae !

 

Coco

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