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Rugose Coral? New species?


GreatWhiteAmmonite

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GreatWhiteAmmonite

Here's some of the odd specimens I've collected and cant identify...please help me, its maddening to have so many of the same thing yet can not ID it...14+yes and counting

LRGpinkRugo1.jpg

BigPurpleRug0.jpg

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GreatWhiteAmmonite

This site is killing me with the low uploading room, guys, isn't there a way to turn it up or something?

I have so many images to upload, I better get busy, lol.

PurpStriation1.jpg

PurpStriation2.jpg

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GreatWhiteAmmonite

The striations on the rock define it as horn coral. The whole thing is one big one.

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GreatWhiteAmmonite
1 minute ago, Fossil_finder_ said:

where is the coral? all I see is a rock

 

I have collected hundreds of these triangular stones that all look alike. I will continue to snap and upload so you can see what I mean. They're all the same tho. Only difference is where it sat in the flow of water, like one goes left one goes right, whatever, they are all the same shape, only diff sizes and composition, some are mud color, some purple, some limestone blue, etc

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GreatWhiteAmmonite
10 minutes ago, GreatWhiteAmmonite said:

I have collected hundreds of these triangular stones that all look alike. I will continue to snap and upload so you can see what I mean. They're all the same tho. Only difference is where it sat in the flow of water, like one goes left one goes right, whatever, they are all the same shape, only diff sizes and composition, some are mud color, some purple, some limestone blue, etc

 

20201201_220821.jpg

20201201_220852.jpg

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
49 minutes ago, GreatWhiteAmmonite said:

I have collected hundreds of these triangular stones that all look alike.

So far I'm not seeing anything but the stones you describe. Most minerals tend to cleave or fracture naturally along weak points. Those can then be worn by weather and the elements to create suggestive shapes. But the process is a natural one acting on a mineral (in your case) of geological origin. 

 

Horn corals have very distinct and easily recognizable forms. 

 297139_1349305456.jpg.cfa04e604cfe7a169ea9602429dfe829.jpg

 

Cheers,

Brett

 

PS. This first example could be a nice sedimentary rock with cross-bedding and/or some conglomerates tossed in the mix. Usually a sign of a moving water when it was formed. Or it could be a metamorphic rock with banding caused by heat and pressure. But to my eyes there isn't yet any indication that there are fossils involved or included in this rock. 

 

BigPurpleRug0.jpg.76aeb9bf61f1d97d8b6b45b1bada4777.thumb.jpg.5f0538f4b264812f3942bf03556c6dbd.jpgBigPurpleRug0.jpg.76aeb9bf61f1d97d8b6b45b1bada4777.thumb.jpg.e3072acbc408588f607fba3ac930833d.jpg

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Rugose or "horn" corals usually show growth lines, septal grooves, and septa at the wide end. 

Your items all appear to be stones, to me. :( 

IMAGE CREDIT: Rugose coral.  paleo.cortland.edu

coralmorph.GIF

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GreatWhiteAmmonite

Listen, I haven't collected hundreds of identical shapes stones, these were alive at one point. They have distinct characteristics that without a macro lens to show you, you can not see. There is nothing more spectacular a feeling when it finally becomes apparent to you after years of not knowing. The lines and shape of the specimen look exactly like the pics of coral you posted, look again, somebody drew the lines and they are exactly like in the pic, even the little divots along the side, all there bud..this is a different species they are like giant leaves but frozen in a rock that sounds like ceramic when tapped. Nothing sedimentary rock about it. It's a fossil. You tell me what it is. It may be a rock NOW but it wasn't that in a previous life. In PA there is bad erosion issues which is why theres not more neat specimens coming out of PA. My buddy's grandpa found a Stegosaur in his field in central PA and I was ID'd by its femur by UPitt. He took it home and covered it back up and said the grandkids can have at it one day, after being offered a handsome stipend to let researchers come get it out. Some of these look so old they are granite, then to the varying extreme some look mummified for the most part. Fresh even. We were under water, then beachfront property to the dinos. It's a mess.

20201201_224800.jpg

20201201_224521.jpg

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GreatWhiteAmmonite

I believe what we are seeing in the purple one is the potentially interrupted growth pattern(Rugose means wrinkled) of a rugose and the mass coming out the end is the fossilized rugose cynidaria or whatever subspecies of squid or jellyfish, or whatever....its the gooey gummy creature inside spilling out, but trapped in substrate with no place to go, it fossilized. Remember, Rugosa are up to 488M years old. That's a lot of tumbling and erosion and before that, lots of pressure. Coal becomes diamonds under the right heat and pressure. Case in point. It's been estimated that 97% of the fossil record was wiped out approx. 251MYA. during an E.L.E. on Earth, coincidently ending the order Rugosa. And Dr. Bob Bakker estimates that 99.7% of Earth's fossils have yet to be discovered. So the possibility it's just heavily worn is great(plus, its PA...). 

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GreatWhiteAmmonite

Here's some of the odd specimens I've collected and cant identify...please help me, its maddening to have so many of the same thing yet can not ID it...14+yes and counting

20201201_224800.jpg

JustTheTipsLOL.jpg

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Thomas.Dodson

No, you've collected stones.

 

I have held my tongue with all of the people who have come on the forum lately with specimens like these but I have to say now that everyone else has shown you and others saintly patience. You claim that you need help identifying them but then you refuse to consider anyone's statements. Why come here at all then?  I ask that you consider the possibility you are wrong. There are many reasons these aren't fossils, like others mentioned, but let me focus on a couple points from your last post.

 

First, Pennsylvania is known for many good fossils. Your claim that Pennsylvania is a wasteland of poorly preserved fossils is downright false. Erosion is in fact how many fossils come to the surface to begin with and how many great finds are found.

 

Second, granite is an igneous rock. Fossils don't become granite, sediment and organic remains become sedimentary (or later metamorphic) rock. Fossils are found in sedimentary rock. "Nothing sedimentary rock about it. It's a fossil" is a statement that makes little sense.

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I understand that it must be very difficult to accept, having collected all these items for more than 14 years, but many of us have been studying such objects for decades longer.

I have a large number of rugose coral species in my personal collection, of different periods of time, from different countries and various of the US States. None of them even closely resemble what you have shown us. I'm sorry to say that they're all just rocks.  

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FranzBernhard

Third pic could be something fossil-related. But unfortunately, the pics are not sharp enough to say anything more definitive.

Please try better pics:

- Use good lightning (sunlight is best).

- Put the specimen on a stable surface, best covered with a dark cloth.

- Focus on the specimen (not on your trousers (?), which are quite nice, btw ;). (Auto-)focusing on the specimen will be easier with a uniform background)

Franz Bernhard

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@GreatWhiteAmmonite

 

You have been a member since 2014 (although not very active).  I think you would know that real fossils are readily acknowledged all the time on the Forum.  If your finds were fossils, we would be the first to congratulate you.  :)

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FranzBernhard
2 hours ago, GreatWhiteAmmonite said:

We were under water, then beachfront property to the dinos. It's a mess.

Thats usual case and thats one of the things that makes geology (in the widest sense) funny, addicting and mostly a soft science, where amateurs can still make significant contributions.

Franz Bernhard

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Some of the rocks look like they could be dreikanter(ventifacts).

Please don't quote me on that, by the way

e.g.

Marc Durand,Syvlie Bourquin

Criteria for the identification of ventifacts in the geological record: A review and new insights

Comptes rendues Geosc.,345/3,2013

(about 7,5 MB)

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I notice there are no pictures of the ends of these items.

IF they were rugose corals, you would see some evidence of septa.

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15 hours ago, GreatWhiteAmmonite said:

(plus, its PA...). 

While pennsylvania does have many awesome fossils that does not mean every rock is a fossil, I live in Colorado but have never found a dinosaur bone... yet, keep looking though there are real fossils in pennsylvania

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19 hours ago, GreatWhiteAmmonite said:

please help me, its maddening to have so many of the same thing yet can not ID it...14+yes

I think this knowledgeable group has addressed your question to provide the help you have requested.   Its your choice to accept it or not.

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