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Rugose Coral? New species?


GreatWhiteAmmonite

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GreatWhiteAmmonite

I appreciate what you all have said, I will absolutely consider all of this...and I did say granite by mistake, some specimen's compositions just remind me of raw granite. I will continue to post these odd specimens here to maybe show a pattern amongst the different "species" I will put forth, I may have jumped the gun on rugose, but it, at this point in time, is the only thing that makes sense. I will gladly mail a handful of similar 'clones' of some of these things for someone's study. Or maybe video chat through my Mac camera, maybe that could pick up the fine details, the different morphology of different clones,or something that's more interactive to show you better. 

20201202_213420.jpg  20201202_214004.jpg

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I'm sorry but I, like the others, do not see any evidence of fossils here. These pieces lack any clear morphological traits or any real consistency (jagged, uneven, asymmetrical edges and overall shapes). 

 

These have every appearance of being purely geological in nature, and our members have explained the geological processes through which some of these may have been formed.

 

I would recommend you research your local geology; the ages, formations, and types of fossils in your area. If you do so you have a good chance of being able to find some incredible fossils. It's quite amazing being able to discover something left unseen for millions of years! 

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13 hours ago, GreatWhiteAmmonite said:

is the only thing that makes sense.

Rock doesn't?

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  • 7 months later...

Great White,

 

I am in the Lehigh Valley. If you want to find rugose corals, go to Stroudsburg. Plenty of them there in the Marcellus shale and some in the Mahantango formation. You will have no doubt when you find one. 

Sorry, but your samples look nothing like rugose corals.  Rocks tend to fracture in different shapes,  some of them can be very regular (like the ones between Summit and New Providence on I-78 westbound for example (Watchung basalt). The first one of your samples definitely looks like a metamorphosed sandstone with cross-bedding. The others are hard to tell but if you polish a side, you can get a reasonable guess.

Also, when you look for fossils, take a look at the PA geological map. If you are in an area where the bedrock is older than Ordovician or newer than Permian or is not sedimentary, you cannot find a rugose coral, period.

 

 

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