Jump to content

Tooth? In Oxford UK


daveinoxford

Recommended Posts

Complete newbie.  This may not even be a tooth.  But there’s been some building work near us (Oxford, UK) and diggers have unearthed lots of unusual rocks.  We’ve found plenty of belemnites and now this.  Any ideas?

53A991F7-7F5D-4EAD-B354-B185DBD79A8E.jpeg

39B08457-F070-4AD7-A977-6B34609F7619.jpeg

8D9B04D4-8034-4824-B9BF-6D0F9A480491.jpeg

3C4BA4E2-8E8A-439E-B37A-6220FE089BC9.jpeg

200B3C17-18ED-4749-B334-C81EBB70D5AD.jpeg

67189F09-740C-45C2-AF57-22990D536078.jpeg

252EA9E4-2294-49EC-8BF0-BA022F139152.jpeg

E6AEDD8B-0B8A-4EC6-A9AF-8A86EB9C2232.jpeg

A814A762-9091-451E-9D0E-F87A2AE8FC88.jpeg

Edited by daveinoxford
Added size
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I would say ichthyosaur as well. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I say tip of a pliosaur tooth. Some of the images show a couple of ridges reaching the apex. Was this from the Oxford Clay? 

 

 

 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

I concur with @paulgdls. The enamel on this looks much more like that or a pliosaur than that of an ichthyosaur. The conservation reminds me of the teeth typically assigned to Liopleurodon sp. found at Wicklesham Pit in Faringdon, though those finds derive from the Kimmeridge Clay from which they have been reworked into Albian (Cretaceous) deposits...

 

All the same, compare with the tooth in this thread:

 

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
pachy-pleuro-whatnot-odon

Just to add that for an ichthyosaur tooth I'd either expect the tooth to be entirely smooth as in a minority of species, or observe at least some remnants of the enamel folds that so typical for this clade of marine reptiles. If the tooth were from a crocodile, on the other hand, I would expect to see carinae - at least one, considering the size of the fragment - and either a lot of very fine striations, or an entirely smooth surface. Instead, I'm seeing a rugose enamel without folds, but with a couple of fine striations, which is a much closer match for plesiosaurian teeth, and pliosaurs in particular. Though Madzia's 2016 article "A reappraisal of Polyptychodon (Plesiosauria) from the Cretaceous of England"        declares that genus a waste-bucket taxon, the figures provided should prove very informative for comparative purposes:

 

peerj-04-1998-g007.jpg.3e38675bc7b87094300215d69b7b5b5e.jpgFigure 7 from Madzia 2016. Note the vermicular striae between the adjacent apicobasal ridges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5ff6442186f55_marinereptiletooth.jpg.70e263c6401b5a335949f847168cdd0e.jpgEnlarged and colour-enhanced version of OP's tooth.

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...