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Hey All,

 

I found this tooth on an early afternoon hunt today in Charleston, SC. I wanted to see if anyone could confirm if it is a Carcharocles angustiden or  if it could possibly be a Carcharocles chubutensis. Reason I ask is the cusps on the side seem less pronounced then other Angy’s I have found and seen. They don’t appear to have broken off. My initial thought is that it is an Angy, but wanted to doubles check.

 

Happy to post additional pics if needed. 
 

Thanks in advance!

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Macrophyseter

The integration of what appears to be the cusps with the main crown makes this something of a chubutensis or juvenile megalodon IMO.

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11 hours ago, Macrophyseter said:

The integration of what appears to be the cusps with the main crown makes this something of a chubutensis or juvenile megalodon IMO.

Agreed

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Definitely not an angustidens, probably a late chub, early meg. Nice tooth!

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@WhodamanHD

 

yeah that makes sense and thanks! I realized it looked more like a meg opposed to angustidens the more I examined after the post. I also read juvenile megs can retain ancestral traits such as lateral cusps which I wasn’t aware of. Thanks for your insight! 
 

The coloring on this one is great. Here is a pic after it dried out. 

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  • 1 month later...

Found this guy in the same exact spot yesterday! Pretty sure that one is a C. angustiden. Would y’all agree?

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Agreed with C. chubutensis or juvenile (not even necessarily early) C. megalodon - and for what it's worth, seaward of downtown, bona fide Oligocene fossils become quite a bit less common and instead Miocene and Pliocene marine verts are more common, with Pliocene fossils being the predominant finds along the coast and Miocene material along the harbor.

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@Boesse

 

so you think the most recent one I found is a early/juvenile Meg or Chub? I definitely think the first one I found is an early/juvenile Meg or Chub. For what it’s worth it was found along the harbor. Thanks for your help!

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Also found this one in the same location yesterday. Is this an Angustiden? It’s so tough for me to differentiate auriculatus, angustiden, and chubutensis.  

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BellamyBlake

I'd say your second one is Angustidens, while the third one almost certainly appears to be Angustidens.

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As far as C. angustidens is concerned, there's quite a bit of variation. The last specimen has more of a notch between the cusplet and crown - typical for about 2/3 of specimens from the Chandler Bridge Formation. Perhaps 1 in 10 or so look like the C. chubutensis posted originally - but cannot be, since it is Oligocene, and therefore C. angustidens, whereas C. chubutensis is an early Miocene chronospecies. So, the age is somewhat more important than the anatomy, but the age is virtually impossible to know for  many of these ex situ finds made along lowcountry waterways.

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Shellseeker

I always loved this one... and in looking for an ID,  I came to realize that there are no Rics, Chubs or Angys in the Peace River. In addition to the cusps, I have always liked the "rawness" of this juvenile Meg.RSCN0953t.thumb.jpg.fec28bc0b583de408196196f2ad80383.jpg

 

 

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@Shellseeker awesome tooth! And yeah it’s tough in Charleston, SC because there are Rics, Chubs, and Angys and as @Boesse pointed out it’s very hard to tell age from these teeth that wash ashore from the Charleston Harbor. 

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