Jump to content

Devonian Glacial Grooves, Kelley's Island


yardrockpaleo

Recommended Posts

yardrockpaleo

Hello everyone,

 

I was hesitant to make this post because I have to give up my secret treasure-trove of marine fossils, but I guess you Ohioans deserve to know. When we went to Cleveland, we stopped at Kelley's Island to go to the beach. Being a fossil-hunter, I started sifting through sand for rocks. I found some, and carefully examined each one. I got all kinds of fossils, about 10-15 in all. That was surprising enough. But then we went to 2 more beaches, and found some real beauties! I am not going to specify exactly where the best trove is, but just search all of them and I guarantee you'll find something. Ever wonder why Lake Erie is such a great fossil hunting place? It's because a certain glacier moved across Ohio in the Devonian Period, and when glaciers move across the earth, they pick up everything in their path, including marine life. So if you want to see traces of the Glacier that formed Lake Erie, definitely go to Kelley's Island. They have a national natural spot called Glacial Grooves (image attached), and the entire pathway is literally paved with shell casts in limestone! I really recommend going there to check it out, I attached some pics of the fossils we found. If anybody has any information on them, feel free to share. I don't know much about them. Thanks!

IMG-3372.thumb.JPG.2ae2bd3bc2aabcadb0c7b1fb775c3486.JPG

MY08GlacialGroovesPD.jpg

IMG-3373.JPG

IMG-3371.JPG

IMG-3370.JPG

IMG-3369.JPG

IMG-3368.JPG

IMG-3367.JPG

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Images 1, 4, 7, 8 are water eroded rugose corals. 

Image 3 is likely a colonial coral (the classic "Petoskey stone"). 

Image 5 is a brachiopod, likely Leptaena. Image 6 is a smattering of corals and possibly bryozoans. 

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Erosion through water-tumbling. :) 

I see quite a few of these, as I'm quite literally surrounded by over a few hundred kilometres of Devonian glacial deposits (which sounds more thrilling than it actually is :D ).  

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree - your material is very water worn. 

 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yardrockpaleo said:

IMG-3371.JPG 

 

 Another water or glacial tumbled rugosa coral. Just look at rocks on the beach. They have been worn round and smooth just like your nice coral.r/fossilid - Any idea what this is? Found on Lake Huron in Au Gres, Michigan

 

By the way, the glacial grooves on Kelly's Island are amazing. Pictures don't do justice. 

 

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to Grad School in Ohio (Miami University - yes, it's in Ohio. University of Miami is in Florida. We had a slogan "Miami was a University before Florida was a State" and it's true). But sadly, I was too busy with school to do much fossil hunting! I did make it up to Kelly's Island to see the glacial grooves...they are amazing! I really wish I had known to look at the rocks on the beach! But then....I might not have gotten my school work done! hahhahah Thanks for the trip down memory lane! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, yardrockpaleo said:

It's because a certain glacier moved across Ohio in the Devonian Period, and when glaciers move across the earth, they pick up everything in their path, including marine life.

Nice fossils. The bedrock is Devonian but the glaciers that carved the grooves occurred in the Pleistocene about 18,000 years ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...