Jump to content

Two Texas DFW Cretaceous Nautilus


NWARockhound

Recommended Posts

20201229_161752.thumb.jpg.f1d38e35e9f3aa10c7fce818b3dd6ed1.jpg

When I was visiting my parents for Christmas, there was a surprise for me in my favorite local creek bed, and it wasn't just how cold the water was!  I've found plenty of ammos there, but these are my first two nautilus.  I tried to find out what they are, but I pretty much got redirected to ammo IDs.  I was also wondering if it's worth buying the HGMS ID books.  I'm curious, but don't really want to spend the money.  These were found in a marl layer, but I'm not really sure which one.  Grayson Marl I believe.  Found in Tarrant County.  Are they cymatoceras?  Cracked one is about 2" diameter, other about 1.5".

20201229_161757.jpg

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thomas.Dodson

I'd like to see photos looking down at the aperture.

 

I have the Texas Cretaceous Ammonites and Nautiloids in paperback from the time I spent in Texas and have found it to be very informative and useful. It's a 10$ PDF download on the HGMS site now and 20$ for paperback so it isn't much of an investment. I'd recommend it.

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I can think of some Georgia creeks that have lots of ammos too.  .22's, .30-06's, .338s, shotgun shell casings, you name it.

 

I agree with Thomas.Dodson that we need some more views including the aperture.

 

Don

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hipockets said:

Could it be Eutrephoceras sp. ?

That was my first thought when I saw them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice. Cymatoceras is correct. Eutrephoceras are found in upper cretaceous deposits and Paracymatoceras have deeper suture folds. Not much else in Texas for nautiloids.

 

  • I found this Informative 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oohh! That is a nice one! :) 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are the apertures.  First photo with is the larger cracked fossil, second is the smaller one.  Thanks everyone!

 

20201229_154053.jpg

20201229_200530.jpg

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

I can think of some Georgia creeks that have lots of ammos too.  .22's, .30-06's, .338s, shotgun shell casings, you name it.

 

I agree with Thomas.Dodson that we need some more views including the aperture.

 

Don

Good to know some things are universal! :BigSmile: The first place I ever went fossil hunting was a popular local spot to blow things up with shotguns

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, NWARockhound said:

Here are the apertures.  First photo with is the larger cracked fossil, second is the smaller one.  Thanks everyone!

 

20201229_154053.jpg

20201229_200530.jpg

 

 

Thanks for the whorl profile views. This confirms Cymatoceras. Eutrephoceras has an aperture that is wider than it is high and a shallow sinus at the venter.

  • I found this Informative 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thomas.Dodson

Definitely Cymatoceras. Cymatoceras hilli would be my guess.

  • I found this Informative 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...