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Bails

Boot recommendation

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Bails

Hey all,

 

I do a lot of shark tooth hunting around Charleston, SC and am in need of new boots. I am not in creeks or anything. It is usually on islands (Drum Island, Morris Island, Cat Island for those that know the area) and a couple other land spots that can get very muddy.

 

I have been wearing these Sperry boots but am curious if there is something out there that would be better. Primarily just looking for a pair that will keep my feet warm and dry and are easy to spray down afterward. 
 

I have been looking at some fishing boots like the ones below, but I feel like there is something better out there.

 

https://www.xtratuf.com/collections/men/products/mens-12-in-legacy-boot-copper-tan

 

https://pelagicgear.com/products/expedition-12-deck-boot-blackcharcoal?variant=29958229262414&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9d2UksCD7gIVBaGGCh326A2pEAQYASABEgJ0JfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds


Apologies if there is already a thread on this. If so feel free to point me to it, but I didn’t see one when I searched.

 

Any help would be appreciated and thanks in advance!

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Allosaurus

While I don't have a lot of experience with many brands, I really like my Solomon pair of boots. They are water resistant, and I've walked through creeks/streams before and kept my feet totally dry and warm. There are spray on coats you occasionally use to keep them water proof, though I think I've only really done that a handful of times since I bought them. They've been pretty good at shedding mud once it dries, but I don't see why spraying them with water wouldn't work either. I will caution you though that if you get the inside of the boot wet (ie, you don't tie them tight enough around your ankles so that water gets inside), they can take days to dry out. Stuffing paper towels down inside them helps expedite the process, but it still took at least 2-3 days for mine to dry out completely. 

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Fossildude19

Moved to COLLECTING GEAR;) 

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Bails

Thanks @Fossildude19!!

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Bob Saunders

They make electric boot dryers for home use. 

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Johannes

I use the HAIX Protector Pro (now in version 2.0 available) for job- and fossilcollecting fieldwork (muddy forests/rocky shores/quarries/construction sites) as well as in overcrowded public trains and busses for 8 years now and I'm still satisfied. They are also some cm higher than comparable trecking boots, one of the reasons I decided to buy those : https://www.haix.co.uk/haix-protector-pro-2.0

 

 

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Abyss

You could try some Muck Boots, many types to choose from depending on water levels. My opinion boots are only waterproof the day you bought them, after that not so much...to me waterproof boots end at the 4 month mark - these are not rubber style boots but the sprayed material lined leather stitched boots, which I prefer laced boots over rubberized boots.

 Muck Boots are a big hit for people here & many use them on the farm and the oilfield, with the scoria being sharp too they do hold up.

 

https://www.muckbootcompany.com

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Sjfriend

Not a boot pro but I can talk a Xtratuf boots. Living and fishing in south central Alaska I wear them ALL the time.

 

As for waterproof, as rubber boots, yes they are. They have excellent anti slip traction on firm slick surfaces. They are really good in mud as well. I actually wear them not just fishing but often for hiking as well. Being rubber they don't like kicking or being hit by sharp rocks on sides / top. Not perfect for ankle support but not bad as they do fit tighter in that area.

 

All things considered, I can recommend them for wet and slippery jobs. They might not be perfect for all jobs but I like them for my life. Also wear them when I visit California in the winter if I'm going looking for salamanders due to a lot of wet and mud.

 

As @Allosaurus mentioned about his boots. If they get wet inside it takes a while to dry out. But as @Bob Saunderssaid, they have electric boot/glove dryers out there which really help. I highly recommend using one if you wear boots a lot to dry them out.

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Sjfriend

Oops, accidentally posted last post twice :DOH:

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Allosaurus
On 1/5/2021 at 1:00 AM, Bob Saunders said:

They make electric boot dryers for home use. 

Yeah, but those don't help too much when one is on the road haha. I do most of my collecting on multi day trips because there is not much immediately close to me. Plus when I travel I tend to avoid motels and prefer basic tent camping, so just not really an opportunity to use most things that require lots of electricity. In this particular instance I got the insides of my boots wet only a few days into the trip. Glad I had brought a spare pair of old tennis shoes with me, because I had to wear them for a few days with my boots out of commission! They just didn't dry well sitting in the vehicle, and I didn't really think about the old paper towel trick until a few days in. Afterwards they dried out much faster and I was rocking my nice DRY boots. Needless to say however, I've never made the mistake of tieing those boots too loosely every again. 

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