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Hey all,

 

I do a lot of shark tooth hunting around Charleston, SC and am in need of new boots. I am not in creeks or anything. It is usually on islands (Drum Island, Morris Island, Cat Island for those that know the area) and a couple other land spots that can get very muddy.

 

I have been wearing these Sperry boots but am curious if there is something out there that would be better. Primarily just looking for a pair that will keep my feet warm and dry and are easy to spray down afterward. 
 

I have been looking at some fishing boots like the ones below, but I feel like there is something better out there.

 

https://www.xtratuf.com/collections/men/products/mens-12-in-legacy-boot-copper-tan

 

https://pelagicgear.com/products/expedition-12-deck-boot-blackcharcoal?variant=29958229262414&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9d2UksCD7gIVBaGGCh326A2pEAQYASABEgJ0JfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds


Apologies if there is already a thread on this. If so feel free to point me to it, but I didn’t see one when I searched.

 

Any help would be appreciated and thanks in advance!

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Allosaurus

While I don't have a lot of experience with many brands, I really like my Solomon pair of boots. They are water resistant, and I've walked through creeks/streams before and kept my feet totally dry and warm. There are spray on coats you occasionally use to keep them water proof, though I think I've only really done that a handful of times since I bought them. They've been pretty good at shedding mud once it dries, but I don't see why spraying them with water wouldn't work either. I will caution you though that if you get the inside of the boot wet (ie, you don't tie them tight enough around your ankles so that water gets inside), they can take days to dry out. Stuffing paper towels down inside them helps expedite the process, but it still took at least 2-3 days for mine to dry out completely. 

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Fossildude19

Moved to COLLECTING GEAR;) 

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Bob Saunders

They make electric boot dryers for home use. 

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Johannes

I use the HAIX Protector Pro (now in version 2.0 available) for job- and fossilcollecting fieldwork (muddy forests/rocky shores/quarries/construction sites) as well as in overcrowded public trains and busses for 8 years now and I'm still satisfied. They are also some cm higher than comparable trecking boots, one of the reasons I decided to buy those : https://www.haix.co.uk/haix-protector-pro-2.0

 

 

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You could try some Muck Boots, many types to choose from depending on water levels. My opinion boots are only waterproof the day you bought them, after that not so much...to me waterproof boots end at the 4 month mark - these are not rubber style boots but the sprayed material lined leather stitched boots, which I prefer laced boots over rubberized boots.

 Muck Boots are a big hit for people here & many use them on the farm and the oilfield, with the scoria being sharp too they do hold up.

 

https://www.muckbootcompany.com

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Sjfriend

Not a boot pro but I can talk a Xtratuf boots. Living and fishing in south central Alaska I wear them ALL the time.

 

As for waterproof, as rubber boots, yes they are. They have excellent anti slip traction on firm slick surfaces. They are really good in mud as well. I actually wear them not just fishing but often for hiking as well. Being rubber they don't like kicking or being hit by sharp rocks on sides / top. Not perfect for ankle support but not bad as they do fit tighter in that area.

 

All things considered, I can recommend them for wet and slippery jobs. They might not be perfect for all jobs but I like them for my life. Also wear them when I visit California in the winter if I'm going looking for salamanders due to a lot of wet and mud.

 

As @Allosaurus mentioned about his boots. If they get wet inside it takes a while to dry out. But as @Bob Saunderssaid, they have electric boot/glove dryers out there which really help. I highly recommend using one if you wear boots a lot to dry them out.

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Sjfriend

Oops, accidentally posted last post twice :DOH:

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Allosaurus
On 1/5/2021 at 1:00 AM, Bob Saunders said:

They make electric boot dryers for home use. 

Yeah, but those don't help too much when one is on the road haha. I do most of my collecting on multi day trips because there is not much immediately close to me. Plus when I travel I tend to avoid motels and prefer basic tent camping, so just not really an opportunity to use most things that require lots of electricity. In this particular instance I got the insides of my boots wet only a few days into the trip. Glad I had brought a spare pair of old tennis shoes with me, because I had to wear them for a few days with my boots out of commission! They just didn't dry well sitting in the vehicle, and I didn't really think about the old paper towel trick until a few days in. Afterwards they dried out much faster and I was rocking my nice DRY boots. Needless to say however, I've never made the mistake of tieing those boots too loosely every again. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
Fossilis Willis

+1 for muck boots. The come in a variety of styles, heights and are available in steel toe. I have heard good things about the comfort of xtratufs, but mucks seem to be a bit sturdier. I wish I had been wearing mine the time I rolled a 500ish pound boulder over my left foot. That was a bad day.

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LabRatKing

If you have a bit to spend, I swear by these.

https://www.naglev.com/product-men-unico-combat-waterproof

Out of stock in the US currently, but I had a friend in Belgium buy me a pair and ship them over.

Waterproof. Kevlar. Can be resoled, and liner is fully replaceable. Last pair of boots one will ever have to buy.

 

Apparently, they just went live with global online purchase, since their only us seller can't keep them in stock!

 

I have an original pair of the low tops that treated me so well, I bought the high tops as soon as they were released. As for the fully waterproof claims, I can attest, this is fact...unlike other big boot makers (Columbia, Danner, etc.) where yeah, the boot is waterproof, but the tongue isn't.

As the inner liner is completely removable and replaceable, I swap out depending what I am doing, everything from waterproof booties for the low tops, to hot weather sweat suckers. The included wool liners are great, but to be honest my skin and regular wool don't get along well, even through socks.

 

 

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  • 3 months later...
Posted (edited)
On 2/3/2021 at 10:44 AM, LabRatKing said:

I have an original pair of the low tops that treated me so well, I bought the high tops as soon as they were released. As for the fully waterproof claims, I can attest, this is fact...unlike other big boot makers (Columbia, Danner, etc.) where yeah, the boot is waterproof, but the tongue isn't.

As the inner liner is completely removable and replaceable, I swap out depending what I am doing, everything from waterproof booties for the low tops, to hot weather sweat suckers. The included wool liners are great, but to be honest my skin and regular wool don't get along well, even through socks.

 

I'm thinking about buying a pair of these. One of my main concerns is that rocks and etc. will get caught between the kevlar outer layer and the inner sock, as there appears to be a gap there - did you notice this being an issue, or is that apparent gap actually well sealed?

Also curious about how they fare in hot weather... I know that the wool is supposed to be "temperature-regulating", but I'm wondering just how well that works when out for a day of hiking in the heat.

Edited by Norki
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LabRatKing
On 5/26/2021 at 9:41 PM, Norki said:

 

I'm thinking about buying a pair of these. One of my main concerns is that rocks and etc. will get caught between the kevlar outer layer and the inner sock, as there appears to be a gap there - did you notice this being an issue, or is that apparent gap actually well sealed?

Also curious about how they fare in hot weather... I know that the wool is supposed to be "temperature-regulating", but I'm wondering just how well that works when out for a day of hiking in the heat.

I have had zero issue with debris getting in the Naglev Unico or Combat. The gap is not nearly as deep as photos and reviewers that have obviously not worn them report. The Unicos are excellent in hot weather. The Combat WP are in my opinion a bit too warm for the summer weather we get here in Omaha....the high humidity keeps them from breathing properly if you are wearing heavy or midweight socks...but this is why I got the Unicos too. However, in hot weather with low humidity, my toes actually get a little chilly. Both styles wick moisture shockingly well, something I am looking forward to in the desert this summer. I have a detailed review of the Combat WP on the US exclusive vendor's site as "Johnny F."

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Bob Saunders

While I have tried them, the outdoor outfitters seem to only sell wool socks. wool dress pants itches. Any real advantage to them. Anyone wear the quick dry shirts or pants. They may be great on a rainy day. 

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LabRatKing
7 hours ago, Bob Saunders said:

While I have tried them, the outdoor outfitters seem to only sell wool socks. wool dress pants itches. Any real advantage to them. Anyone wear the quick dry shirts or pants. They may be great on a rainy day. 

I wear all of the above. Quick dry shirts and pants are great, but make sure you get the ones with the high UV rating. I wear the "fishing shirt" style in the desert. I wear the quick dry pants (costco brand) when the weather or terrain isn't appropriate for my trusty fossil hunting kilt.

 

As for wool socks, not all wool is the same. The Navy used to make us wear wool socks with ourr winter uniforms and it always gave me horrible rashes on my feet. Most of the wool hiking and hunting socks are merino wool, which I assure does not itch. In my opinion Merino wool is overpriced, and even the lightweight socks are too warm for hot humid weather. However, they really do keep your feet from smelling bad, and they really do keep you warm even when wet. Sheep are just as bad for the environment as petroleum based products, so do don't think you are being eco friendly by getting them. I tried out a number of brands of these trendy merino wool socks (Smartwool being the worst)back in April. None of them were very durable and the prices were far too high. In addition, I found them to be too warm in temps of 60F and not warm enough in temps below 35F. In my opinion, merino wool is an overpriced trend and not a good choice for anyone that actually goes outdoors. They are fine for rich folks that want you to think they go outdoors.

 

In spring and fall I wear good medium weight cotton socks (costco brand here too!). In cold weather I wear DarnTough brand medium and heavyweight over-the calf socks. These are excellent, and have a lifetime unlimited warranty when you buy them direct from DarnTough. Save your receipt! When they wear out, send them and the receipt in and three days later you get a brand new pair with the same warranty.

In bitter cold and/or wet conditions, I wear SealSkinz socks. they have a variety of styles, are excellent moisture wickers...and I kid you not are 100% waterproof. Yes, no joke, 100% waterproof socks. I thought his was a load of malarkey, but honest to Cthulhu, they are likely the best cold and wet footwear you can buy.

 

In the desert, it is Naglevs and DarnTough on my feet. In winter it is Naglevs and Sealskinz. If the weather is really bad, or the temps are below freezing, I wear Columbia BugaBoot w/ Omni Heat with Sealskinz. In the summer around home, its barefoot as much as possible, otherwise cotton costco socks and either Naglevs or Sulewa Wildfire GTX approach shoes.

During Snake Season, I wear Danner Vital snake resistant kneeboots with DarnTough socks.

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Thomas.Dodson
16 hours ago, Bob Saunders said:

Anyone wear the quick dry shirts or pants. They may be great on a rainy day. 

Almost always. I'm known for jumping into random creeks and rivers (for work as well as fossils) and quick dry shirts and pants are great. As someone who also sweats a lot The quick dry is good for when the breeze picks up or you're briefly running the AC in the car in between sites. Like LabRatKing said look for clothes with good UPF (ultra violet protection factor) ratings.

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