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Doug Von Gausig

I run across these guys frequently in the Mississippian Redwall Limestones around Arizona's Verde Valley. They are generally accompanied by lots of Crinoids and solitary Rugose Corals. They're always this oval shape with segmented structure. They look like an isopod, to me, but could be some other crustacean. 

 

Any help out there for the identification of these "bugs?"Isopod-20210208_163236-1s.thumb.jpg.a08cd0418699214c7ebd5b07ecda036a.jpgIsopod-20210208_163142-1s.thumb.jpg.00d8351e54c2fca7ca270d05df70352c.jpg

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IsaacTheFossilMan

I'm personally not seeing anything organic. Is it crystalline? Also, if you could, attach some pictures of the other ones you've found, it could really help! Edit: I'm not very knowledgeable with isopods, so, by all means, veto this comment!:headscratch:

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I would also lean towards isopod. You might ask George D.F Wilson. He will know.

Thomas

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Not enough visible to be truly diagnostic, but an isopod may be likely, though the conspecifics described may indicate juvenile trilobites, or even more likely something akin to modern Chitons.

 

however, the slight serrations visible in some views indicate crinoid columnals fractured as an angular cross section to me.

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17 minutes ago, LabRatKing said:

 

....however, the slight serrations visible in some views indicate crinoid columnals fractured as an angular cross section to me.

Could also be.

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Yeah, Think this is a crinoid column section in cross section as well...

 

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On 9.2.2021 at 3:09 PM, Doug Von Gausig said:

I run across these guys frequently in the Mississippian Redwall Limestones around Arizona's Verde Valley. They are generally accompanied by lots of Crinoids and solitary Rugose Corals. They're always this oval shape with segmented structure. They look like an isopod, to me, but could be some other crustacean. 

 

Any help out there for the identification of these "bugs?"

 

Usually you can see the "crabby" texture if it is an isopod, hope the picture inserted is good enough to give an idea, this is Palaega Danica from northern Jutland in Denmark

 

DSC_0877 (3) Palaega danica.JPG

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Doug Von Gausig

I can see the pores in the photo you posted, but my critter is not in as good a state of preservation to show these. I am leaning more and more toward crinoid stem seen obliquely.

 

Thanks!

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Doug Von Gausig
On 2/9/2021 at 2:30 PM, LabRatKing said:

Not enough visible to be truly diagnostic, but an isopod may be likely, though the conspecifics described may indicate juvenile trilobites, or even more likely something akin to modern Chitons.

 

however, the slight serrations visible in some views indicate crinoid columnals fractured as an angular cross section to me.

I'm leaning more in that direction, and thanks!

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Doug Von Gausig
3 hours ago, Packy said:

It looks like there are irregular lines between each section, it coild be a crinoid stem section broken on a angle.   Packy

Yeah, I'm thinking you're right, Packy.

 

Thanks!

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When I saw the first picture, my initial reaction was: it’s a polyplacophoran (chiton)!  Which would be really cool as they are relatively rare, especially as articulated fossils. It had a nice rounded head valve, the correct number of intermediate valves, very neat. And then I looked at the second picture and closer at both of then and sadly (for me) I have to agree with the others, they look like fractured crinoid cross sections.  Interesting none the less. 

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IsaacTheFossilMan

Upon further inspection, yes, I was wrong with the "inorganic" comment. Crinoid columnal, agreed.

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  • 11 months later...
Ernest H. Williams, Jr.

The segments do not look like an isopod.

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14 hours ago, Ernest H. Williams, Jr. said:

The segments do not look like an isopod.

 

This was clear months ago.

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