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England Ammonites


Allosaurus

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Allosaurus

I picked up 3 ammonites last summer and was told they were from England, but with no additional information such as age or locality :(. I'm hoping someone out here might be able to help me ID them to genus or perhaps even have ideas as to where they originate.

 

#1

2021-02-16-21-01-28.jpg

2021-02-16-21-01-05.jpg

2021-02-16-21-00-43.jpg

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Hard to tell without the necessary information. #1 is indecipherable for me. #2 may be Garantiana or another Peresphinctid and #3 perhaps Dorsetensia. But those are both just wild guesses.

  • I found this Informative 1
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caterpillar

The 1 could be an Hildoceras. But as Roger said, difficult to tell without informations

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Allosaurus

Thanks everyone. Yeah, I figured it was a long shot, and I appreciate your input. I'll just notate them as unsure with question marks and the possible identifications. 

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As mentioned above, number 1 has a few similarities to Hildoceras that we find along the Whitby coast. The matrix is totally different though 

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abyssunder

Are you sure they can't be from Madadagascar?

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Allosaurus
1 hour ago, abyssunder said:

Are you sure they can't be from Madadagascar?

I won't say with certain as I didn't collect them, but I would be a little surprised if the locality was incorrect. I've never seen ammonites like these come from Madagascar. Have you see similar ones with a provenance out of Madagascar?

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fifbrindacier

All i can say is that you can write Jurassic for your identifications. And i agree the number two is a perisphinctid.

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BentonlWalters

Just a guess, but the colouring and preservation is very similar to Jurassic ammonites found in Somerset from the Beacon Limestone Formation at places like Kingstone (https://ukfossils.co.uk/2016/06/10/kingstone/) which is Pliensbachian to Toarcian in age. With this in mind the first appears to be Hildoceras sp. and the second probably Dactylioceras sp.. I'm less sure about the third one though. 

 

Hopefully this helps.

Benton

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Reconquistador

Number 1: I would say, that it is Hildoceras. One can see lateral groove, which is not very common character. Some Hildoceras species are well known for it (other genera which posseses it, like Cleviceras, Parahildaites, Ochetoceras or other looks differently). Tricarinate-bisulcate venter is also well visible. By quadrate whorl section and only weak lateral groove, I would expect it to be Hildoceras lusitanicum. But I am not completelly sure about it.

Number 2: This is much harder. It looks like Dactylioceras (Dactylioceras). And it not only looks like that, but as preservation is similar to the first one, they may come from the same locality and age and these genera occured together. I do not know how to identify species of this genus (with few exceptions), but this one is certainly not D. (D). praepositum, D. (D.) holandrei, or D. (D.) athleticum. It is quite similar to D. (D.) commune (which is quite common species as its name suggests) and many collectors would name it as such, but it could also be something different.

Number 3: If it comes from the same locality and age, then it should be some Harpoceratinae indet.

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IsaacTheFossilMan

I can't help with ID, but, if they're from the UK, they'll be Jurassic. :)

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will stevenson

They look like they are from the beacon limestone fm. Of somerset, I can’t think of another formation With that preservation, if so the species would 

1.hildoceras

2.dactylocerous

3. harpoceras 

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Reconquistador

Harpoceras is highly probable. Sadly, ribs are poorly visible, but they seems to be falcate. If so, it is Harpoceras. If they are only falcoid, it can also be Cleviceras, but falcoid ribs are not excluding possibility of it being some species of Harpoceras. For Cleviceras, it also seems to be quite too evolute, but it might be still on the margin of possible variability of this genus.

Comparison of falcoid and falcate ribs on Wikimedia Commons (my work)

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Kosmoceras

No doubt these are from Beacon Limestone Formation around Ilminster.

 

15 hours ago, IsaacTheFossilMan said:

I can't help with ID, but, if they're from the UK, they'll be Jurassic. :)

 

We do have Cretaceous ammonites in the UK too! 

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IsaacTheFossilMan
2 minutes ago, Kosmoceras said:

We do have Cretaceous ammonites in the UK too! 


Yes, but the preservation lends itself to Jurassic. 

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