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Shark tooth Id and bone


Zenmaster6

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Zenmaster6

Pleistocene Texas coast

 

2nd might be wood but might be horn / tusk 

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
11 minutes ago, Zenmaster6 said:

For size.

Hi There .. this is a Carcharhinus sp. or a "Bull" shark in collector speak. But honestly these teeth can be associated with Bull/Dusky/Silky sharks etc .. and they all look very similar to one another.

 

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Cheers,

Brett 

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PaleoNoel

Tooth is Carcharhinus sp. and the bone is probably indeterminate.

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Zenmaster6
1 minute ago, PaleoNoel said:

Tooth is Carcharhinus sp. and the bone is probably indeterminate.

You think its a bone? or could it be horn / tusk. Im not seeing the regular pourous structure on the edges

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PaleoNoel
Just now, Zenmaster6 said:

You think its a bone? or could it be horn / tusk. Im not seeing the regular pourous structure on the edges

Yeah I think it's just regular bone. If it were tusk there wouldn't be that cancellous structure on the inside, while horn cores typically have grooves and additional holes on the outside to feed the keratinous tissue covering it. 

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Thomas.Dodson

Agreed on Carcharhinus and agreed on bone. Diving a bit more into the Carcharhinus, the large toothed Carcharhinus species are very similar as Brett mentioned above. In part C. falciformis and C. obscurus can be differentiated by the coarseness and irregularity of their serrations when compared to C. leucas. The foramina is in the upper part of the root in C. leucas as well compared to it being comparatively lower in C. obscurus. Despite this they can still be difficult to tell apart. I think I see the remains of the foramina in the upper portion of the root although it is worn and I'm not certain from the photo.

 

I'd lean towards C. leucas based on the serrations but I'd feel better if the foramina matched as well. Elasmo has a page on differentiating C. leucas and C. obscurus with photos illustrating the characteristics I mentioned above. Elasmo Link

 

 

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Familyroadtrip

First is a bull shark tooth. I think the second is an unidentifiable bone fragment.

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hemipristis

Concur w/  C. leucas. Blade shape, serrations, and the placement of the foramen

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