Jump to content

NSR Unknown 2-25-2021


Recommended Posts

Hi Everyone, 

 
Found this morning at North Sulfur River, Delta County, TX. First pic is one side. Third pic the other. Any idea?

 

 
 

20210225_133743.jpg

20210225_133755.jpg

20210225_133730.jpg

20210225_133818.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
ThePhysicist
33 minutes ago, LabRatKing said:

Nope.

 I'm certainly not good with coprolites, but it has at least a superficial resemblance to others found there:

 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it seems to resemble a couple of the pieces in the other post. Well, poo! I thought I found something different. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it kind of does. Now that would be a cool find. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
LabRatKing
4 hours ago, westcoast said:

This looks like button coral

 This was my thinking too, but for some reason the rest of my first post was missing! ( just now noticed that)

Link to post
Share on other sites
HuckMucus

Appears to be an external mold fossil from the place where coprolites originate.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, HuckMucus said:

Appears to be an external mold fossil from the place where coprolites originate.

Can you explain? Maybe I am reading it wrong. Are you saying it looks like a button coral that was eaten and then passed? Or, the mold of the animal?

Link to post
Share on other sites
HuckMucus
57 minutes ago, Planko said:

Can you explain? Maybe I am reading it wrong. Are you saying it looks like a button coral that was eaten and then passed? Or, the mold of the animal?

I apologize.  I failed to read the room.  When I first saw the first post/photo, a coprolite did not come to mind.  Rather, . . . never mind.  I'll endeavor to check myself in the future.

Link to post
Share on other sites
fossilnut

The Cretaceous seems to be the totally wrong age but my first reaction was that this was a lobolith=a crinoid bulb/float. these are known primarily from the Silurian/Devonian. But I have seen ones from the Miocene. So they persisted through the Cretaceous. Looks like some crinoid symmetry. The roundish shape of the fossil with some indentation (that's not the right term) just speaks to me of a lobolith. Just My 2 cents  In the Western Interior Seaway a floating crinoid Unintacrinidae (Grinnel) existed in the Cretaceous.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Captcrunch227

This looks like coprolite to me. This looks like coprolite I’ve found at NSR

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, the matrix is not that hard. Let me remove some. Maybe that will help. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
GeschWhat

Sorry, I'm late to respond. This looks like a beautiful little coprolite to me. However, it is unusual that the pinch (sphincter) marks are on both sides. Usually these are just on one side. The other is usually concave.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

For comparison:

 

crinoidfloat.jpg.2ba8b66f2b0f8bf6f530342fb21c578b.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
HuckMucus
49 minutes ago, GeschWhat said:

Sorry, I'm late to respond. This looks like a beautiful little coprolite to me. However, it is unusual that the pinch (sphincter) marks are on both sides. Usually these are just on one side. The other is usually concave.

 

 

I don't even know what kind of critter we are talking about, but with elk, a nipple on both sides is a cow, and a nipple on one side with an indent on the other side is a bull.  Something do do with feces passing the prostate?

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
GeschWhat
6 minutes ago, HuckMucus said:

I don't even know what kind of critter we are talking about, but with elk, a nipple on both sides is a cow, and a nipple on one side with an indent on the other side is a bull.  Something do do with feces passing the prostate?

Fascinating! I didn't know that. I'm going to have to take a peak at the deer poop in my aunt's yard. My husband is a hunter. He mentioned that with white tail deer, the more compact clusters of pellets are usually from a stag. Those that are loose are usually from a doe. I wonder if there pellets would be similar to an elks. I've never really looked into it. I will now. Thanks for that! :D

 

This coprolite would be from a carnivore. I think those with the nipple structure are generally attributed to marine reptiles, since modern crocs leave pinched ends like that sometimes. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
HuckMucus
47 minutes ago, GeschWhat said:

Fascinating! I didn't know that. I'm going to have to take a peak at the deer poop in my aunt's yard. My husband is a hunter. He mentioned that with white tail deer, the more compact clusters of pellets are usually from a stag. Those that are loose are usually from a doe. I wonder if there pellets would be similar to an elks. I've never really looked into it. I will now. Thanks for that! :D

 

This coprolite would be from a carnivore. I think those with the nipple structure are generally attributed to marine reptiles, since modern crocs leave pinched ends like that sometimes. 

I learned it when I was a pup.  Later, I guided elk hunts in the Selway-Bitterroot and used it then.  It only works when they are dropping pellets (late summer/fall/winter) because they drop pies, too.  Side bar:  I'd carry milk duds in my pocket and when we'd come across a pile of pellets, I'd have one or two milk duds in my hand, reach down and act like I was grabbing a few pellets, the pop the milk duds in my mouth.  I'd squint with my best Clint Eastwood, look off into the forest and say: "I reckon we're about an hour behind him."  The client would shift his weight a little, look around and say something like "okay."  Inevitably, it would be the talk among the hunters back in camp.  "My guide didn't do that!"  LOL!  

  • Enjoyed 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
Al Dente
On 2/27/2021 at 9:13 PM, fossilnut said:

The Cretaceous seems to be the totally wrong age but my first reaction was that this was a lobolith=a crinoid bulb/float. these are known primarily from the Silurian/Devonian. But I have seen ones from the Miocene. So they persisted through the Cretaceous.


Do you know of any published accounts of Cretaceous or Miocene loboliths? A Miocene lobolith would be an interesting find.

Link to post
Share on other sites
GeschWhat
On 3/7/2021 at 7:40 PM, HuckMucus said:

I learned it when I was a pup.  Later, I guided elk hunts in the Selway-Bitterroot and used it then.  It only works when they are dropping pellets (late summer/fall/winter) because they drop pies, too.  Side bar:  I'd carry milk duds in my pocket and when we'd come across a pile of pellets, I'd have one or two milk duds in my hand, reach down and act like I was grabbing a few pellets, the pop the milk duds in my mouth.  I'd squint with my best Clint Eastwood, look off into the forest and say: "I reckon we're about an hour behind him."  The client would shift his weight a little, look around and say something like "okay."  Inevitably, it would be the talk among the hunters back in camp.  "My guide didn't do that!"  LOL!  

That is TOO funny! Love you sense of humor. :notworthy: :default_rofl:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...