Jump to content

Florida Unknowns Part 2


Recommended Posts

minnbuckeye

As part 2 of my attempt to ID my recent Florida finds, I will present a variety of fossils collected from the Peace River area. @Shellseeker had given me an opinion on some, but I am forgetful and want to verify. Actually it may not be forgetfulness as much as wanting to get back to sifting for more fossils as Jack is talking to me, so I wasn't listening well!!!

 

 Hopefully not a chunkasaurus2021-03-048.thumb.jpg.b235f9c94625ef38851e7e5d98ca1872.jpg 

  Can't remember if Jack said tapir or pecary

2021-03-311.thumb.jpg.1d5b35c8c0aab422fa7ac43b6d388f80.jpg

 

  Shrimp burrow?

2021-03-312.jpg.cf524d35d30aee871c79ec16af14faca.jpg

 

 Another chunk of bone but it might be identifiable to those who deal with bone2021-03-313.thumb.jpg.b8dc1fbce8112270936f65bc2977fbd5.jpg

 

  ?????????????????? Odd one to me

2021-03-314.thumb.jpg.0d36b4dabde74c704968b2b5b6fa79be.jpg 

Another possibly identifiable bone

2021-03-315.jpg.a3e9039ce20ab2b38a57b58406d7254a.jpg

 

 This feels light and airy. Are there crabs (modern) that live in fresh water or is this a fossil.

2021-03-316.jpg.f05210d4f798b6336cfa6bcbd3ba1cc0.jpg 

 

 claw core?????2021-03-317.thumb.jpg.a62766cdb8854e4d6538234a80512ab0.jpg 

 Another bone with joints visable

2021-03-318.thumb.jpg.993af47888c6c6e233fa5d2193615f93.jpg

  

 

 Mammoth tooth fragments?

2021-03-319.jpg.b441a236baf18a352ee1c594206bc66a.jpg

 

 Seems like something.2021-03-320.jpg.eb59abc56d04b23530995c786578deb0.jpg 

 This is an earbone but it is VERY tiny. I am used to finding much larger ear bones2021-03-321.jpg.4ed3f85b1796508291d20b93679147ee.jpg

 

 Horse tooth fragment? Hopefully something else.2021-03-322.jpg.8b478b0784699786592e3e05b91bebe6.jpg

 

 Tiny bony thing. I have no clue.

 2021-03-323.jpg.c2dff3296b1961689d520caa58a3a778.jpg

 

  Beat up tooth of something

2021-03-324.thumb.jpg.43e40f48f6e20c247cc490b9bc3245de.jpg 

 Again, I hope this is something other than a suggestive rock. Seems like hoof core???

2021-03-325.thumb.jpg.2968087fc22e94eae56ba1b4541c812a.jpg

 

 Probably just stone, but the canal has me perplexed2021-03-326.jpg.f84b2523bfc09ba8967f1da80b9d868a.jpg 

 Unfortunately,my next photos didn't capture what looks very much like a tortoise spur. But this item has something attached underneath and confuses me.

2021-03-327.thumb.jpg.07351d2c3aa2f6fc5c90e2a855023d81.jpg 

 I think Jack verified barracuda teeth.

2021-03-328.jpg.2fe878aecab6ade1feffb6277cc5fbe2.jpg

 

  Seems like something, maybe dinosaur egg!!!!!!!!!!

2021-03-329.thumb.jpg.9a18a3741fe6864a9f66b0bc40b7fbf0.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

No. 11 is an m2 from Sus scrofa, domesticated pig.

 

pig_sus_scrofa.JPG.7fe03d7f1134b44959ff86f81096c3d8.JPG

  • I found this Informative 2
  • Thank You 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

No. 29 looks to me to be an osteoderm from a xenarthran, most likely from a glyptothere based on the depth of the root.

  • I found this Informative 1
  • Thank You 1
  • I Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Mahnmut

Very interesting collection. I would like to take a walk there.

18: there definitely are freshwater crabs, but I have no idea if this belongs to one.

28 : maybe whale bulla?

I am really courious about 16.

Concerning 11, here in Europe Sus scrofa means wild boar (domestic pigs are of course the same species).  In the Americas there used to be only peccaries and the pigs sensu strictu are descendant of domestic pigs? I think I read something about it on the forum.

Best regards,

J

  • Thank You 1
  • I Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Mahnmut

25 could be piece of an ulna? Or something fishy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Number 20 looks like a podial bone of some sort

Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

No, 20 appears to be a bovid (bison, probably) ectocuneiform.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

No. 17 appears to be an Equus scaphoid.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

No. 23 is a whale bulla, perhaps from a kogiid like Kogiopsis.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis
22 minutes ago, Mahnmut said:

18: there are freshwater crabs, but i have no idea if this belongs to one.

28 : maybe whale bulla?

I am really courious about 16.

Concerning 11, here in Europe Sus scrofa means wild boar (domestic pigs are of course the same species).  In the Americas there used to be only peccaries and the pigs sensu strictu are descendant of domestic pigs? I think I read something about it on the forum.

Best regards,

J

 

Thanks, J, for your input.  Wild boar never made it to the New World.  Feral pigs are abundant in the Peace River Valley, and their remains are often recovered from streams in Florida.  Besides natural deaths, they are hunted here, and their butchered remains are sometimes thrown in the rivers to feed the 'gators and turtles.  The No. 11 tooth is pig, not peccary.

 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye
30 minutes ago, Harry Pristis said:

o. 23 is a whale bulla, perhaps from a kogiid like Kogiopsis.

 

Thanks for your response on my "tapir" tooth! disappointing but better to know. 

As for the whale bulla, isn't it too tiny? Other ones I have found seem 10x bigger. 

 

Actually, I found out that these can be as small as 2 cm.

Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDAWG
33 minutes ago, Harry Pristis said:

 

Thanks, J, for your input.  Wild boar never made it to the New World.  Feral pigs are abundant in the Peace River Valley, and their remains are often recovered from streams in Florida.  Besides natural deaths, they are hunted here, and their butchered remains are sometimes thrown in the rivers to feed the 'gators and turtles.  The No. 11 tooth is pig, not peccary.

 

Just to add a tiny bit of information for people not familiar with southeastern USA rivers, the water is rich in tannins from decaying plant material and this can stain bones and teeth almost black in a short time (years, but not a whole lot of years).  As a result it is not possible to distinguish modern from fossil bones or teeth from the color. 

 

Don

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thecosmilia Trichitoma

16 looks like an interestingly worn bivalve steinkern to me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis
13 minutes ago, minnbuckeye said:

 

Thanks for your response on my "tapir" tooth! disappointing but better to know. 

As for the whale bulla, isn't it too tiny? Other ones I have found seem 10x bigger. 

 

Actually, I found out that these can be as small as 2 cm.

 

I concur, it's better to know.

 

I should have posted an image with the suggestion of kogiid bulla.  Here's mine:

 

whale_periotics_KogiidaeA.thumb.JPG.9df7a352376bab9c362788fc5ac4a6df.JPG

  • I found this Informative 2
  • Thank You 1
  • Learned something new 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye

Thank you @Mahnmut, @Kiros, @Harry Pristis, and @Thecosmilia Trichitoma for helping me understand a group of fossils that I do not deal with often. I guess the rest will go into the junk pile as I do not keep anything that doesn't have a partial ID. 

 

 Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites
Shellseeker
2 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

Thank you @Mahnmut, @Kiros, @Harry Pristis, and @Thecosmilia Trichitoma for helping me understand a group of fossils that I do not deal with often. I guess the rest will go into the junk pile as I do not keep anything that doesn't have a partial ID. 

 

 Mike

Mike,

What is the success ratio?  31 - 11 +1 = 21 total.  How many identified.  and which are left?

 

#11 is definitely a shrimp burrow, #21 are mammoth,  #22 is likely another broken shrimp burrow,  based on last photo #24 is mostly likely horse. #27 is more likely hoof core, and #28 is most likely mudrock concretion.

I would reproduce the few (#13, #15, #25....) that are clearly fossils and have an ID possible from any future browsers....

 

On Thursday, I found this one that also looks like hoof core or Ungual, similar to your #25. I might never ID it beyond toe bone...

 

 

Hoofcore1.JPG

Hoofcore2.JPG

Hoofcore3.JPG

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

Mike is smart: better to collect identifiable fossils, rather than "may be" fossils.  That's not any sort of toe bone, Jack.  It's the sheared-off proximal corner of a bone from something.

  • I found this Informative 1
  • Thank You 1
  • I Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
jerseygurl

Nice stuff!  
IMO sometimes it pays to take it “home to the lab”!for further analysis. 

  • Thank You 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye
2 hours ago, Harry Pristis said:

Mike is smart: better to collect identifiable fossils, rather than "may be" fossils.

Actually I collect "maybe" fossils then scrutinize them at home. Removing the maybe's that remain is the next step. Truth be known, most finds from the Peace River are maybe's to me, so obviously, looking at what I have collected over the years, many of these turn into somethings!!!!! For example, a piece of what I thought was turtle shell today turned into 3/4 of a glyptodont scute when I looked carefully!! And to think it was it was destined to my junk pile.

 

 Mike  

 

 @Shellseeker Jack, thanks for your input, at the water's edge and here on the forum. My trip report will hopefully come in the next week. Have you ever seen a steinkern (#16) like this from the Peace? I see the likelihood, but it just seems so bone like. 

 

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites
Shellseeker
5 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

 @Shellseeker Jack, thanks for your input, at the water's edge and here on the forum. My trip report will hopefully come in the next week. Have you ever seen a steinkern (#16) like this from the Peace? I see the likelihood, but it just seems so bone like. 

Sometimes many of these steinkerns of different shapes and sizes. Empty shells fill with mud, the mud hardens into rock, the tannic acid in the river dissolves the shell.  The more common ones I see are Ark, Cardita, and Cockle shells.

I actually keep a few that have more perfect imprints of the original seashell.   Jack

 

  • Thank You 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

No. 23 is an oceanic dolphin (Delphinidae) tympanic bulla - something like Delphinus or Stenella.

  • Learned something new 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...