Jump to content
Tessy

Michigan's Landscaping Rocks

Recommended Posts

Tessy

Seems that in every rock pile or landscaping rock material I'll find a bit of coral or some fossil. Is this true for others?

(I've heard that landscaping material is generally from a local source, but in truth you can't say where the specimine is from.)

Edited by Eli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Placoderms

Seems that in every rock pile or landscaping rock material I'll find a bit of coral or some fossil. Is this true for others?

(I've heard that landscaping material is generally from a local source, but in truth you can't say where the specimine is from.)

Eli,

I've considered looking in landscaping rock but haven't yet...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tessy

Placoderms,

it's kinda fun, neighbors looking at you like you're nuts ;) "did you loose your keys?"

I've not found anything super great, just small stuff, but it's helping me learn and you can do it even when it's cold.

Edited by Eli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossils by great lakes

Seems that in every rock pile or landscaping rock material I'll find a bit of coral or some fossil. Is this true for others?

(I've heard that landscaping material is generally from a local source, but in truth you can't say where the specimine is from.)

I have found good brachiopod, bryozoan, and coral in landscaping rocks in MI, and gravel (like stuff used for decorating around buildings, in ditches, etc.) also yields occasional Petoskey stone-like corals and individual brachiopoda. As to the source of the rocks, in SE. Michigan (Detroit, Pontiac, Monroe, etc.) Sylvania, Ohio could be one source, or the mines downriver. Alpena (big limstone quarries) is also a likely source of landscaping rocks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tessy
Alpena (big limstone quarries) is also a likely source of landscaping rocks.

I've found these hash cobbles all around MI but I think they must be from a single "formation" or quarry. (I went to that Sylvania OH quarry and the fossils seem to have a grey silver color, from the matrix shale i guess.) So I was wondering if anyone knows where these come from. They are mostly made of byros and shell bits.

thanks!

post-2723-0-54139100-1303889325_thumb.jpg

Edited by Eli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
glacialerratic

Eli, those look like they were left by the glaciers, and generally come from your north/north west. Hard to say exactly what formation/unit they are from -- they may no longer exist. Lots of fun looking at these rocks, though. Try smashing one with a 3lb. sledge. You can find cephalopods, trilobite bits, and occasional fish bones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tessy

Eli, those look like they were left by the glaciers, and generally come from your north/north west. Hard to say exactly what formation/unit they are from -- they may no longer exist. Lots of fun looking at these rocks, though. Try smashing one with a 3lb. sledge. You can find cephalopods, trilobite bits, and occasional fish bones.

Thanks michigantim.

Is it that they are sort of rounded that gives a clue to glacier action?

I tried to cut that lower right one with a Drummel drill but it was too messy. I like that tip but I don't have a sledge hammer. :judge:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sean P

Hey,

I just found a bunch yesterday in the parking lot islands. I found some walking through the park last week. Probably walked over thousands of times each year. They're all over in the Ann Arbor area.

Sean P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ramo

I had a guy bring me one of the biggest and nicest Ptychodus teeth I have ever seen. He found it where he works in the landscaping rock around the building. Since then I always look over landscaping rocks, and I did find a nice preform of a

"Arrowhead" in some. Bits of petrified wood, and water worn pieces of fossilized bone are fairly common here in Kansas.

Ramo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×