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April 5th, 2021 Peace River unknown


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I was out Monday unsuccessfully looking for inverts, but came back with a ton of shark teeth and a few of the more common vertebrate finds. would appreciate an ID id anyone would like to take a chance. The overall length is 101 mm. I'm thinking a dog sized animal but have no clue.

 

Thanks for the look see!

 

DSCF1953.thumb.jpg.3f024352a4d2a660bf2966574d7a8404.jpg

 

DSCF1954.thumb.jpg.b4ce34a9772bfb27560c497dc8fd80bc.jpg

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I love finding toe bones (found a nice Equus sp. proximal phalanx last week in the river). This one looks to be in excellent condition and seems to have appropriate distinctive features that should hopefully allow it to be successfully identified.

 

Waiting for the experts to chime in to get their take on this. @PrehistoricFlorida @Harry Pristis

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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52 minutes ago, Sacha said:

I was out Monday unsuccessfully looking for inverts, but came back with a ton of shark teeth and a few of the more common vertebrate finds

I like this, haha, just the opposite of what you usually hear.  Better luck next time!!  Probably going to need an end view of the phalange to ID it, at least I would, maybe those familiar with the local finds can ID it as is.  very nice!!

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Harry Pristis

This appears to be a metapodial, rather than a toe (phalanx).  I am uncertain of the ID.  I can eliminate a number of taxa, but can't eliminate peccary (though one side should be distinctly flat).  Perhaps images of the bone ends would help.

 

peccarymetapodials.jpg.56b82feda76dd7c77876944b6db8f1c2.jpgpeccarymetapodialsingle.jpg.e4faa07f07506fef68552410afb508f4.jpg1211994333_carnivoretoesB.JPG.702f6db823cc90b67762532880df0fac.JPG

 

 

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46 minutes ago, Harry Pristis said:

  Perhaps images of the bone ends would help.

 

Hope these help. Some damage to one end but doesn't really look that bad.

 

DSCF1955.thumb.jpg.2eb59e53bab8df8e831ce36ddc817420.jpgDSCF1957.thumb.jpg.1c0060b77588684621255b2441325d8a.jpgDSCF1958.thumb.jpg.035901aa9d5bdf02a23afc7e6bc4bac0.jpgDSCF1959.thumb.jpg.53407c6361325a6679a0d7cf51ccca63.jpg

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Harry Pristis

Peccary is looking more likely.  I think I see a callus where the two metapodials were in close contact.

 

paraxonicfeet.jpg.43672e1d380e080a8ae3df51b72d7f97.jpg

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Thanks Harry. I thought the same after your comment and the picture looked like a scar on the side. Much obliged.

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  • 2 months later...
PrehistoricFlorida
On 4/6/2021 at 12:09 PM, digit said:

I love finding toe bones (found a nice Equus sp. proximal phalanx last week in the river). This one looks to be in excellent condition and seems to have appropriate distinctive features that should hopefully allow it to be successfully identified.

 

Waiting for the experts to chime in to get their take on this. @PrehistoricFlorida @Harry Pristis

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

It's a metapodial from a tapir. 

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Thanks for the confirmation. ;)

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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  • 2 weeks later...

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