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Fruit pod or something?


jnicholes

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OK, so once again, I found something today. I would like an ID on it.

 

It’s about the size of my thumbnail, looks like a piece of a prehistoric fruit or something. I honestly don’t know what it is. It looks like it  was once attached to a prehistoric plant, you can see in one of the pictures. 
 

I’m not sure what it is. Any help can be appreciated on this. Found in Boise, Idaho.

 

It is cloudy right now so the light conditions are not best.


 

 

66CA92C1-84D4-4DF9-8D2E-2DB72DD3F6DE.jpeg

29EB67A2-F13C-43AE-85E2-FB521B5318D2.jpeg

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I'm not sure, but it may also be something recent...was this loose in the ground, or did you excavate it from a definite exposure/formation?

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Looks similar to sea beans. 

 

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1 hour ago, jnicholes said:

OK, so once again, I found something today. I would like an ID on it.

 

It’s about the size of my thumbnail, looks like a piece of a prehistoric fruit or something. I honestly don’t know what it is. It looks like it  was once attached to a prehistoric plant, you can see in one of the pictures. 
 

I’m not sure what it is. Any help can be appreciated on this. Found in Boise, Idaho.

 

It is cloudy right now so the light conditions are not best.


 

 

66CA92C1-84D4-4DF9-8D2E-2DB72DD3F6DE.jpeg

29EB67A2-F13C-43AE-85E2-FB521B5318D2.jpeg

This is a seed from the Kentucky Coffee Tree or one of the related species.

 

https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/kentucky-coffee-tree

 

These are kind of neat in that they are difficult to grow from seed. There is a hypothesis that they have to pass through the digestive system of a large ruminant....likely something in the mastodon or mammoth family.

 

To grow your own the need a hot acid bath, scarification and cold stratification....and even then have about a 5% germination rate.

 

They are all over the place as a result of humans. They were once popular for landscaping and in some places, food.

Edited by LabRatKing
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