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Shannon Billingsley

Hi everyone! Long time lurker, first time poster haha. I’m still kind of new to this so sorry if this is a super obvious ID, but I was wondering what kind of tooth this is exactly. I was thinking crocodile, but it seems to have a slightly different shape so I wasn’t sure. I found it at Ginnie Sprints in High Springs on the Santa Fe River in Florida. It’s about 2 1/4” long. Thank you in advance for your help! :)

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Neanderthal Shaman
Posted (edited)

Looks pretty crocodilian to me. I think typically you'd be able to see some striations going up the length of the tooth, but it seems pretty waterworn. 

Edited by Neanderthal Shaman
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digit

Crocodilian teeth are pretty hollow in the root and have either 2 carinae for gators or a dozen or so for crocodile. Not really looking like either of these types of teeth. Let's see what others have to say.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Harry Pristis

I think this is a proboscidean tusk, either a juvenile upper or a juvenile lower.

 

 

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digit

Would make a whole lot more sense. Thanks, Harry!

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Shannon Billingsley

That’s crazy exciting! Thank you so much for your help everyone :)

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Shellseeker
Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Harry Pristis said:

I think this is a proboscidean tusk, either a juvenile upper or a juvenile lower.

 

Harry,  I was considering that also,  along with Kogiopsis.  I think you are correct, because I can not detect banding.  @digit Did I not see a Montbrook photo with 2 small tusks sticking out of the matrix?

 

TuskSantaFe.thumb.jpg.b91e93114c829671720f628bb21f434a.jpgTuskSantaFeCrop.JPG.77441e891f3897237d7d40c97dfa9e09.JPG

Edited by Shellseeker
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darrow

Agreed this is probably a juveile proboscidean tusk.

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Harry Pristis
1 hour ago, Shellseeker said:

Harry,  I was considering that also,  along with Kogiopsis.  I think you are correct, because I can not detect banding.  @digit Did I not see a Montbrook photo with 2 small tusks sticking out of the matrix? 

 

I believe there are no Miocene whale fossils to be found in the Santa Fe River.  If there were any Miocene fossils to be found, they would almost certainly be land animal fossils freed from river-eroded sinkholes.

 

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digit
8 hours ago, Shellseeker said:

@digit Did I not see a Montbrook photo with 2 small tusks sticking out of the matrix?

Possible--even quite likely. But not from me. Previous years we've only been able to attend Montbrook for a few days each season (due to living in South Florida). We've been out at least 2X per week for the fall and spring sessions since we've moved up to Gainesville so we've put in more time this year than we have in the 4 years previous. We've run into lots of gomphothere bones over the last several months but there haven't been any tusks found in 2020/21.

 

We're just now back from Montbrook and cleaned-up with the truck unpacked and ibuprofen coursing through out veins. Today was the final day of the spring 2021 volunteer season at Montbrook. The site will be tarped and sand-bagged over the next couple of days to keep it from melting into a sand puddle over the summer rainy season.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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