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Early Eocene Omomyid jaw from the Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia donated to the Smithsonian Institution


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MarcoSr

I found the below partial jaw with two molars several years ago in the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia and donated it to the Smithsonian Institution.  Dr. Ken Rose studied the jaw and wrote a paper on it which was just published on-line by the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.  With Covid it took a bit longer to get the paper on this jaw written and published.  Here is the paper citation: Kenneth D. Rose, Jonathan M. G. Perry, Kristen A. Prufrock & Robert E. Weems (2021): Early Eocene Omomyid from the Nanjemoy Formation of Virginia: First Fossil Primate from the Atlantic Coastal Plain, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, DOI:10.1080/02724634.2021.1923340.

 

Below is a link to an earlier thread on this partial jaw.

 

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/110349-omomyid-primate-partial-jaw-from-the-eocene-of-virginia/

 

 

Two things I would like to point out about this partial jaw:

1) From the paper title: “First Fossil Primate from the Atlantic Coastal Plain”.

2) From the DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS of the paper: Considering its geographic separation from other known North American, as well as European, omomyids, it almost certainly represents a previously unknown species.  However, in the absence of premolars (often the most diagnostic teeth in omomyids) or any other anterior teeth, or obvious derived molar traits, it would be premature to create a new taxon for this fragmentary specimen.

 

 

These are my original pictures of the jaw (4 mm X 4 mm X 1.5 mm).  The paper contains better ones.

 

123011945_MammalTooth3mmX3mmX1mmMC1.jpg.d7d5508f9fc2b725e7f59b53f965f3cb.jpg

 

53132335_MammalTooth3mmX3mmX1mmMC2.jpg.ec359f402f4e6eed9fcade8400f9b763.jpg

 

1074894181_MammalTooth3mmX3mmX1mmMC3.jpg.09d5e776c9faf08a83558ab8d7d4d71b.jpg

 

1550885509_MammalTooth3mmX3mmX1mmMC4.jpg.545469db34eb724e11f2a941581e469a.jpg

 

 

Marco Sr.

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FossilDAWG

Congratulations, and thanks for your generous support of the science.  :fistbump:

 

Don

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Fossildude19

Well done, sir!  :tiphat:

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Excellent find and donation, Marco.

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Auspex

The 'Micro King' strikes again! ;^)

Well done, Sir!

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Brett Breakin' Rocks

giphy.gif

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An intriguing fossil, Marco!  Certainly a foundation for future discoveries.

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Troodon

Congratulations super find and I'm sure a welcomed addition to the Smithsonian.  Boy all the times I collected in that deposit never heard of anyone finding this type of material.  Very special.

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piranha

Ape-solutely Amazing!

 

crazy monkey 148

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Hi,

 

Congrats Marco !

 

Coco

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FossilNerd

Well done Marco! :thumbsu:

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Finally! Glad to see this specimen's journey into the official record is complete.

 

:yay-smiley-1:

 

Very very very cool!

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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MarcoSr
8 hours ago, FossilDAWG said:

Congratulations, and thanks for your generous support of the science.  :fistbump:

 

Don

 

8 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Well done, sir!  :tiphat:

 

7 hours ago, jpc said:

Excellent find and donation, Marco.

 

7 hours ago, Brett Breakin' Rocks said:

giphy.gif

 

5 hours ago, piranha said:

Ape-solutely Amazing!

 

crazy monkey 148

 

4 hours ago, Coco said:

Hi,

 

Congrats Marco !

 

Coco

 

1 hour ago, FossilNerd said:

Well done Marco! :thumbsu:

 

Thank you for your comments.  I’ve made over 210 trips to the Nanjemoy Formation over the last 25 years to collect matrix to search for microfossils.  It is very gratifying to find a specimen like this omomyid jaw.

 

Marco Sr.

 

7 hours ago, Auspex said:

The 'Micro King' strikes again! ;^)

Well done, Sir!

 

Thank you.  There are many scientifically important specimens to be found in the microfossil realm.  Collectors just need to look for them.

 

Marco Sr.

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MarcoSr
5 hours ago, JohnJ said:

An intriguing fossil, Marco!  Certainly a foundation for future discoveries.

 

Thank you.  I just need to find an omomyid jaw piece with a premolar so the species can be named.

 

Marco Sr.

 

5 hours ago, Troodon said:

Congratulations super find and I'm sure a welcomed addition to the Smithsonian.  Boy all the times I collected in that deposit never heard of anyone finding this type of material.  Very special.

 

Thank you.  Terrestrial mammal specimens are exceptionally rare in the Nanjemoy Formation which was a near shore marine environment.  I’ve been lucky to have found two partial terrestrial mammal jaws that had scientific value.

 

Marco Sr.

 

25 minutes ago, digit said:

Finally! Glad to see this specimen's journey into the official record is complete.

 

:yay-smiley-1:

 

Very very very cool!

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

Thank you.  Yeah, I had to ask a TFF administrator to remove that original TFF post on this specimen that I made several years ago until the paper could be written and published.

 

Marco Sr.

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Very nice and scientifically important specimen! I saw colleagues tweeting excitedly about this earlier today and wondered if it had originated here in this community....glad to see it did!

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MarcoSr
10 hours ago, jdp said:

Very nice and scientifically important specimen! I saw colleagues tweeting excitedly about this earlier today and wondered if it had originated here in this community....glad to see it did!

 

Thank you.  I was lucky that I know Dr. Ken Rose and that he was willing to look at the jaw.  Otherwise, the jaw still would be in one of my gem jar displays without me knowing what it was.

 

Marco Sr.

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8 hours ago, MarcoSr said:

I was lucky that I know Dr. Ken Rose and that he was willing to look at the jaw.  Otherwise, the jaw still would be in one of my gem jar displays without me knowing what it was.

A prime example of the value of amateur and professional paleontologists working together for the common good. As has been stated countless times, there are many more amateurs who have significantly more time and effort available to them. This enables them the opportunity to encounter these rarities--the winning lottery tickets of the fossil world. How many other scientifically important specimens are languishing unrecognized in amateur collections?

 

Cultivating a working relationship with professionals provides the pathway to allow these SIS to find their way into the hands of researchers who have the ability to use it to expand our fossil knowledge. While it is great having access to professionals who are experts in various fossil specialties, it takes considerable avocational fossil knowledge to know when a fossil is unusual enough that it should be brought to the attention of someone with deeper knowledge on the off chance that could be something important.

 

Marco is very familiar with the fossils coming out of the Nanjemoy Formation and thus was able to quickly recognize that this specimen was an oddity that it was worthy to show to someone with deeper knowledge.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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MarcoSr
12 hours ago, digit said:

A prime example of the value of amateur and professional paleontologists working together for the common good. As has been stated countless times, there are many more amateurs who have significantly more time and effort available to them. This enables them the opportunity to encounter these rarities--the winning lottery tickets of the fossil world. How many other scientifically important specimens are languishing unrecognized in amateur collections?

 

Cultivating a working relationship with professionals provides the pathway to allow these SIS to find their way into the hands of researchers who have the ability to use it to expand our fossil knowledge. While it is great having access to professionals who are experts in various fossil specialties, it takes considerable avocational fossil knowledge to know when a fossil is unusual enough that it should be brought to the attention of someone with deeper knowledge on the off chance that could be something important.

 

Marco is very familiar with the fossils coming out of the Nanjemoy Formation and thus was able to quickly recognize that this specimen was an oddity that it was worthy to show to someone with deeper knowledge.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

Ken

 

I have very good relationships, built up over the years, with a good number of researchers with different areas of expertise.  However, I only send them very good pictures of specimens that I know are very unusual or unique from the different formations that I collect.  As a result, when they get pictures from me, they look at them.  Unfortunately a lot of amateur collectors send tons of very bad pictures of really common stuff to these researchers, and then they are very disappointed by the researchers' lack of interest.

 

Marco Sr.

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Yup. I'm sure Richard Hulbert sees a truckload of dugong rib bone photos each year and it likely gets tiresome replying to these (or he has a great stock answer written up that he can copy and paste). Having the modicum of knowledge to know when you've got something that is not run of the mill and only sending images of the true novelties will definitely get you better and more timely replies from the subject matter experts.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Jeffrey P

Stupendous find! Congratulations on your worthy donation to the Smithsonian and to science. Here, here!

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MarcoSr
1 hour ago, Jeffrey P said:

Stupendous find! Congratulations on your worthy donation to the Smithsonian and to science. Here, here!

 

Thank you.  Dr. Rose is making 3-D printed copies from the specimen and will send me one.  I've never seen a 3-D printed copy before in person, so I'm really looking forward to receiving it.

 

Marco Sr.

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Very cool! Post photos (which I know you will) when you get your 3D copy.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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bcfossilcollector

Congratulations on a remarkable find!  Magnificent contribution! Just amazing!  

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MarcoSr
9 hours ago, bcfossilcollector said:

Congratulations on a remarkable find!  Magnificent contribution! Just amazing!  

 

Thank you.  I'm just glad that the paper is finally published.

 

Marco Sr.

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