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Hey all,

 

I wanted to share a large Isurus desori tooth I found this weekend in Charleston, SC. It measures just over 2 1/4 inches and is the biggest I have personally found! 

73BA1212-5306-47EB-B415-3DFD8CF301F2.jpeg

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Praefectus

Great find!

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siteseer

That's a great tooth.  Some of the largest Isurus desori/oxyrinchus I've seen have come out of Charleston or Summerville (Chandler Bridge Formation).

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GreatWhiteMac

Beauty of an Isurus!  Congrats :fistbump:

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Thanks everyone! 
 

@siteseer I actually stumbled upon this thread from 2017 where you mentioned the same. Very interesting that some of the larger ones have come out of the Chandler Bridge Formation. Never know how to differentiate between desori/oxyrinchus. Guess it could be either. 

 

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siteseer

I'm just glad to be consistent.

 

In the old days, some people called a modern shortfin mako tooth, I. oxyrinchus and the fossil form, I. desori.  Some put the cut-off at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary.  It seems to be the same shark generally getting larger though the giant teeth from the Oligoene buck that trend.  Some ecological factor allowed the species to get larger though the giant teeth are uncommon.  The desori/oxyrinchus teeth always seem to be rather uncommon where they occur in the Miocene and Pliocene likely because it's more of an open ocean shark.

 

Jess

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