Jump to content

Fossil or not?


PetrosTrilobite

Recommended Posts

PetrosTrilobite

A friend have find this tooth in a greek place and give it to me. I think is from horse or a relative animal. No idea if this a fossil. Pliocene, Pleistocene, or just Holocene?

 

 

IMG_20210622_180628.jpg

IMG_20210622_180645.jpg

IMG_20210622_180826.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

We will need a  clear photo of the chewing surface.

Link to post
Share on other sites
val horn

it certainly looks like a fossil, but not a common presentation for teeth.  Can you get more detail on where it was found.

Link to post
Share on other sites
hadrosauridae

I dont think its a fossil, I think its part of a stalagmite/stalactite formation. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
FranzBernhard
2 minutes ago, hadrosauridae said:

I dont think its a fossil, I think its part of a stalagmite/stalactite formation. 

Wow! That would be a really good faker!

Franz Bernhard

Link to post
Share on other sites
PetrosTrilobite

It is tooth. I can't take better photo but 1000% this is tooth. The non-sure is if this tooth is a fossil or recent animal.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
val horn

It looks like a horse tooth, as others stated a better picture of the chewing surface will help confirm this.   I have many bone  fossils with that white and black crackled texture so I believe that it is a fossil,  but have never seen a tooth that looked like that, where I dont see enamel.  A horse tooth is 50% enamel and most enamel starts  with a 90% mineral composition and does not change greatly during fossilization (think shark teeth the color changes during fossilization but the enamel remains hard and shiny)    That is why I asked for more location information.  I am having a hard time understanding what I am seeing.   what kind of conditions could lead to this pattern,   I am reaching for straws here ?  what happens to a tooth dropped into a hot mineral spring?

I would try a burn test on the broken root surface as this should have more dentin and less enamel that the crown as one test for fossilization,  the other thing I note on my fossil teeth is how heavy they are for size so I would also consider that.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry Pristis

It's an equus horse left m3 -- probably not a fossil.

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...