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Hello, I am considering adding a French egg, but would like a look to see that it isn't composited and seems ago.

 

This is labelled as Cairanoolithus, from Herault. Now, most French eggs I see are scrambled like this  one. Would calling it an egg be accurate--or is it more, partial eggshell? Given the fact it's broke, I assume this is the remains of a hatched egg? Or is the damage on these done pre-fossilisation? Also--just to confirm that a smooshed egg like this, it's the remains of ONE single egg, and not the shattered remains of two or multiple eggs that are all mashed together on the matrix and gotten jumbled together? Ideally, I'd want a compete egg--but I've seen one or two that have been sold and they go for in the thousands, so I'm thinking if this checks out, it may be a way for me to add a French egg for an affordable price.

 

edit: I also see a few articles saying cairanoolithus likely comes from a nodosaur--possibly Struthiosaurus. Is that accurate?

 

Dimension is 23 x 18 x 6cm.

 

Many thanks

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Edited by FF7_Yuffie
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The egg looks normal and there are no obvious signs of it being composited.  However, its a partial egg < than 50%.  Im not sure its Cairanoolithus but Megaloothius since the shell has some ornimatation. 

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Pixpaleosky

Yes it is a partial egg, a typical one from Meze area in south of france, they look very different from the ones of Aix en Provence outcrops.

I cant say the species of this egg (cairanoolithus also has ornementation).

It seems alright, the matrix is certainly full of glue because it is clay but thats ok, and the shells may have been cleaned with acid.

Edited by Pixpaleosky
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Thanks for taking a look. I will get some closer pics of the shell, if that will help narrow it down whether its cairnoolithus or megaloothius. Am I right in that Hypselosaurus eggshells have now been reclassified as the more generic magaloothius too?

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Pixpaleosky

no a simple look wont be enough, there are other criteria (thickness and structure of the shell).

when I identify my own egg discoveries i can put a name on it because I know from paleontologists which species have been discovered on which outcrops.

 

Hypselosaurus is a name which has been cancelled long time ago, all types of eggs were associated to it.

 

 

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