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Mercydarko13

I found this while hunting the creek bed in the little woods adjacent to my house in Ireland Indiana. I was examining it and 3 seconds into doing so, my brain forgot it was a rock and I screamed and dropped it. I know snakes can't be fossilized but this seems to be a real petrified snake head. I was wanting your opinions and tried my best to get good pictures. What do you think it is?

 

IMG_20210728_044911.thumb.jpg.88a002db226bee81cc511bc899308be9.jpgIMG_20210728_043556.thumb.jpg.107950ae0b5da95e5366fbbcbaef406c.jpgIMG_20210728_044517.thumb.jpg.6c0b518871a08f3cf4d0001de7b1d9c2.jpgIMG_20210728_043709.thumb.jpg.b64f757a40f7804064c7963be3ec44f5.jpgIMG_20210728_044226.thumb.jpg.2e83abc57666dff4e94154a39ff2b5b6.jpgIMG_20210728_044911.thumb.jpg.0eaa0aff4c4b169f3d072c03ea564784.jpgIMG_20210728_044306.thumb.jpg.4cb3eb0ae15b5a8328cc82b4f157da4f.jpgIMG_20210728_044412.thumb.jpg.84d54b03fa6ca510351e821deaa4ca7e.jpgIMG_20210728_044749.thumb.jpg.af8ee3c3da4d4185f0da7897836afda8.jpg

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Harry Pristis

Ooooo!  Yes!  A snake!  Squirmy and bitey!  It was brave of you, Mercydarko, to pick it up again.  :look:

 

Looky here, an octopus devouring a brachiopod!   :egypt:

 

geodebrachiopod.jpg.851817e74ec448c9074b240ed0d6059c.jpg

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FossilDAWG

Harry's leg-pulling notwithstanding, it is a geodized crinoid calyx.  Pretty nice!

 

Don

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Malcolmt

Yep nice little crinoid calyx

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Troodon

Here is what a crinod looks like if you did not know.

 

 

unnamed.jpg

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abyssunder

Crinoid calyx, I agree, but I'm not sure if it goes to the well known geodized category, although it is very close to that.

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Mercydarko13

Actually I find crinoid calyxes all the time in that Creek bed. These are the ones I found this evening besides the 2 at the bottom. Geodized of course.IMG_20210728_214930.thumb.jpg.34f043b1483c4e27903bff6575e3904d.jpg

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Mercydarko13

And that octopus too... IMG_20210728_223023.thumb.jpg.b59988699888bfafe7c34f2ab73855d8.jpg

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Mercydarko13
6 hours ago, abyssunder said:

Crinoid calyx, I agree, but I'm not sure if it goes to the well known geodized category, although it is very close to that.

And I have to agree with you that it's not a geodized crinoid calyx because here are others I've found in the same creek bed and I find geodes too. I included the one identified as a crinoid at the top. If it looked like the crinoids I find i wouldn't have wondered why it actually looked like some scaled creature.

IMG_20210728_224608.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad

Tis a different type of crinoid calyx to your usual finds, methinks. 

Rather a nice one, too. :)

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Mercydarko13
35 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Tis a different type of crinoid calyx to your usual finds, methinks. 

Rather a nice one, too. :)

I put it in a group the same size. Definitely out the norm for any crinoid I've found and completely different. I picked ones close to size and unfortunately the comparisons are geodized because they are all I have ever found. A petrified snake is of course stretching it but a crinoid never crossed my mind. IMG_20210728_232804.thumb.jpg.31180c527572b67e036e1a58c41aa61d.jpg

Thanks to all for your input.  I appreciate it. 

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Tidgy's Dad

Yes, a petrified snake's head is not a possibility here, they don't preserve like this. A smidgin of, pareidolia, one gently suggests.  

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Snake heads can certainly become fossils. And although I know of none with the scales preserved, this is certainly not an impossibility based on the spectrum of lizard fossils. That said, this is not a snake. I was seeing a coral, maybe something like Favosites, but I haven't seen enough crinoid calyces to argue for or against that ID.

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Harry Pristis

 

18 hours ago, abyssunder said:

Crinoid calyx, I agree, but I'm not sure if it goes to the well known geodized category, although it is very close to that.

 

I agree that these originally may have been crinoid calyces, perhaps inflated during the geodizing process (accretion is not limited to the size of the seed fossil).  If "geode" doesn't work for you, these specimens may be called "pseudomorphs after crinoid calyces."  Similarly, the agatized corals from the Tampa Silex Beds (Florida's state gemstone) are pseudomorphs after coral as well as (usually) geodes.

 

 

 

 

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Mercydarko13
13 hours ago, Carl said:

Snake heads can certainly become fossils. And although I know of none with the scales preserved, this is certainly not an impossibility based on the spectrum of lizard fossils. That said, this is not a snake. I was seeing a coral, maybe something like Favosites, but I haven't seen enough crinoid calyces to argue for or against that ID

Due to a snakes structure fossilization is a process that takes too long from my understanding but they can be petrified. It's a rare occurrence but possible. The defined scales are the thing that bothers me most about it. A person can think they see something in a rock and it's just that... Stuff they see and no one else does but the scales on this are so blatant that you almost think you could pick one off of it. That is my one hold out in completely agreeing that it isn't reptilian in nature. 

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daves64

I agree with the calyx ID, but I can see how the snake head idea came to be. My first thought was crinoid, but I could also see the resemblance to a snakes head. It always amazes at how nature can create so many different shapes & images that can boggle the mind. But without them, life would be so very dull. :i_am_so_happy:

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bthemoose
On 7/29/2021 at 10:31 PM, Mercydarko13 said:

The defined scales are the thing that bothers me most about it. A person can think they see something in a rock and it's just that... Stuff they see and no one else does but the scales on this are so blatant that you almost think you could pick one off of it. That is my one hold out in completely agreeing that it isn't reptilian in nature. 

 

Here's a photo of a fossilized crinoid calyx from the British Geological Survey along with their description: "The calyx is made of polygonal plates, arranged differently in different groups of crinoids."

 

P549503_1332x690px.jpg.15e62b66bf5e300d250383791cc963b5.jpg

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Mercydarko13
On 7/30/2021 at 10:40 PM, bthemoose said:

 

Here's a photo of a fossilized crinoid calyx from the British Geological Survey along with their description: "The calyx is made of polygonal plates, arranged differently in different groups of crinoids."

 

P549503_1332x690px.jpg.15e62b66bf5e300d250383791cc963b5.jpg

That was a very good in depth read on Crinoids. Thanks for sharing that as I bookmarked the whole site. The one thing different where I am located is only finding them in the silicified or geodized state. They are in my creekbeds. Here's a little info.

https://www.mindat.org/mesg-545970.html 

The Indiana geological survey took notice of my crinoids as some of the best they have seen via my Instagram so I'm going to find that post and see if they could offer a little more insight on the why that crinoid is so different from the others. Your post really provided me with the best info so far. Thanks so much!

 

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fifbrindacier

That's a nice calyx, i agree with the others.

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Opabinia Blues

Since we have an ID I’d like to add for educational purposes that snakes can indeed become fossils, and they have a pretty well-documented fossil record. Most of what is known is vertebrae, but skulls have been found as well.

 

869D5197-409B-4302-B6F5-037B974D821F.thumb.jpeg.fbc22280f07da54043f60b27f884729c.jpeg
 

Pictures: Najash, Upper Cretaceous Patagonia.

 

Source: https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/11/eaax5833

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