Jump to content

Recommended Posts

JurassicMeasures

Greetings, 

 

I’ve recently gotten back into prospecting fossils and I’m looking for some suggestions on sites to visit in western Pennsylvania. I frequently visit Ambridge PA to find fern and Calamite fossils from the Mahoning fm and would like to find more. I also would like to find fossils of early Permian (tetrapods, plants, or invertebrates). I hear that Washington county (south of Pittsburgh) has some great spots and would like to know if it were true. I also would like to show some of my findings from Ambridge as well. 
 

Note: I’d like this to be suggested places not just western PA but West Virginia and eastern Ohio as well.

EDD95E6D-787E-415B-8A88-B3FF1A847516.jpeg

D86E12A4-DF76-4450-AE09-1FDA447282F3.jpeg

84805456-E993-4AFC-9ADB-09D71DBAC84C.jpeg

35C922A5-1CC4-4AA4-ADCF-55E16A87154C.jpeg

9840CD07-C97A-4B3D-B447-8D95385D5B87.jpeg

6D4140D6-BE93-4FB1-B18F-54AF72183C01.jpeg

89FE314D-67C6-43CD-AC60-8F63CC1E3644.jpeg

B79556E6-64C6-4F26-95AB-BFCADC2AEFDF.jpeg

6C47E217-2D97-49A9-9A78-0909A0BCFAA7.jpeg

Edited by JurassicMeasures
  • Enjoyed 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • JurassicMeasures changed the title to Fossil Sites in Western PA?

Can't help with any sites, but wanted to say those are some nice finds!

Welcome to the Forum. :)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice finds! I get the chance to hunt Ambridge every few years and enjoy it tremendously. It is so different than hunting in Minnesota. Being from Bowling Green, do you hunt the Cincinnatian or Silurian too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to TFF. I can’t offer sites either. But those are some very nice fossils you’ve found. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tetrapods are pretty sparse in Western PA and if you find any they ought to be reported to the Carnegie Museum. In terms of localities to collect at, you can find plant fossils just about anywhere. You used to be able to collect marine inverts (and Paleozoic shark teeth) at places like Sewickley Bridge roadcut, but those are largely closed to the public now. However, roadcuts and other places with lots of exposed rock are worth looking around in; there's some good exposures of the Brush Creek Limestone and Ames Limestone north of Pittsburgh which are full of brachiopods, cephalopods, and rugose corals, and occasionally shark teeth (Petalodus, Deltodus, Glikmanius, Saivodus, etc). 

 

If you are willing to go a bit further afield, Eighteen Mile Creek near Buffalo has excellent trilobites, cephalopods, brachiopods, etc, and rare placoderm pieces. That's about a 3 hour drive from Pittsburgh but good for a full day trip on a weekend.

  • I found this Informative 1
  • Thank You 1
  • I Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, jdp said:

If you are willing to go a bit further afield, Eighteen Mile Creek near Buffalo has excellent trilobites, cephalopods, brachiopods, etc, and rare placoderm pieces. That's about a 3 hour drive from Pittsburgh but good for a full day trip on a weekend.

 

A NOTE TO ANYONE LOOKING TO HUNT ON 18 MILE CREEK IN NORTH EVANS, NY:

 

Please keep in mind, 18 Mile Creek is now posted NO TRESPASSING from the fisherman's lot to the lake shore. This is where the landowners have blocked access to the creek exposures.

To hunt the creek, you need to head east, (away from the lake shore ) on the creek from the Fisherman's lot off of Old Lakeshore Road.

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Western PA is, in fact, quite fossiliferous, but vertebrate remains (as @jdp mentioned) are quite rare. Articulated remains are incredibly rare, and should certainly be donated when found. I am lucky enough to have a site that produces vertebrates on my property; that being said, everything in that collection will probably end up being donated. Plants and marine fossils are common at road cuts, just be careful when you do collect as the cliffs are often unstable and quite tall. If you end up finding anything feel free to PM me and I will try my best to identify them. Happy hunting!

  • I found this Informative 1
  • Thank You 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
JurassicMeasures

I used to live in Buffalo and worked as a park educator at the Penn Dixie fossil park for a few years. I have my share of trilobite fossils. I currently live in Pittsburgh and I love the abundance of fossils everywhere. I know I’m being a bit ambitious but I’d like to be those lucky few to find some rare like tetrapod fossils in the western PA area.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...