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A few pieces of Tusk found need help ID please


Brondonh

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Hello, I managed to find a few different pieces of tusk and I need help with ID or maybe a link to any good resource for fossil ivory identification.

These were all found in Bradenton, FL at one individual site. Not all were found together. I will lable them when I post the pictures. 

Thank you very much.

 

The first set below I found all together. They are pretty straight and have what appears to be enamel on the outside. Maybe Gomp?

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Edited by Brondonh
Needed to add FL
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This next set I found together at a different location. I found the molar very close to them, it looks like Gomp.

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This next piece I found close to the first set, but not with it. 

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I would also like to add that I found many fragments of Mammoth molars scattered around the sight. 

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I’m not in a position to help you, but the specialists will answer you.

Don't take your fossils in the hand to make your photos, it accentuates the blur of moving (visible here) and the hands are not a good indication of measurement, there are all sizes!

In addition to the origin and age of the terrain in which the fossils are found, size is also important for proper identification. I invite you to read my last link in my signature. If you don’t have a rule, print the document I made available and put your fossils on it before making your photos, making sure to leave a box with the apparent size (pedagogical message) ;)

 

Coco

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26 minutes ago, Coco said:

I’m not in a position to help you, but the specialists will answer you.

Don't take your fossils in the hand to make your photos, it accentuates the blur of moving (visible here) and the hands are not a good indication of measurement, there are all sizes!

In addition to the origin and age of the terrain in which the fossils are found, size is also important for proper identification. I invite you to read my last link in my signature. If you don’t have a rule, print the document I made available and put your fossils on it before making your photos, making sure to leave a box with the apparent size (pedagogical message) ;)

 

Coco

Thank you for the advice. I will see what I can put together.

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3 hours ago, Brondonh said:

Maybe Gomp?

I'm not the expert, but I'll hang around this camp to wait with you.

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Shellseeker
7 hours ago, Brondonh said:

I found the molar very close to them, it looks like Gomp.

Gomph and Mastodon are similar.  Your tooth is gomph.  It will be up to you to identify the tusks.. This is a piece of Gomphothere tusk. It has intersecting Schreger lines marked in Red and Blue. If the intersection angle is 90 degress or less === mammoth. Otherwise Mastodon or Gomph.  Look at your pieces , find the Schreger lines and tell us what it is.SchregerLinesGomph.JPG.6decce3741efe1687ad62c50e23d3967.JPG

 

There are a number of species within the Florida Gomphothere genus.

Selected-tusks-and-tusk-fragments-of-Cuvieronius-or-Rhynchotherium-A-C-D-orTEXT.JPG.b4287f8f93c01832ae9e0f9abb524ad3.JPGSelected-tusks-and-tusk-fragments-of-Cuvieronius-or-Rhynchotherium-A-C-D-or.png.153d061831255d03d50dfb693d4303d7.png

 

@digit has volunteered at the Montbrook site in Florida and shown TFF this great photo of a Rynchotherium tusk. Note the enamel "band" that partially covers the tusk. NICE unusual finds!!!

P2027667Tusk2.jpg.a4e3f8ad70f3d66c253241f1e0828e76.jpg

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Brondonh
On 9/30/2021 at 7:46 AM, Shellseeker said:

Gomph and Mastodon are similar.  Your tooth is gomph.  It will be up to you to identify the tusks.. This is a piece of Gomphothere tusk. It has intersecting Schreger lines marked in Red and Blue. If the intersection angle is 90 degress or less === mammoth. Otherwise Mastodon or Gomph.  Look at your pieces , find the Schreger lines and tell us what it is.SchregerLinesGomph.JPG.6decce3741efe1687ad62c50e23d3967.JPG

 

There are a number of species within the Florida Gomphothere genus.

Selected-tusks-and-tusk-fragments-of-Cuvieronius-or-Rhynchotherium-A-C-D-orTEXT.JPG.b4287f8f93c01832ae9e0f9abb524ad3.JPGSelected-tusks-and-tusk-fragments-of-Cuvieronius-or-Rhynchotherium-A-C-D-or.png.153d061831255d03d50dfb693d4303d7.png

 

@digit has volunteered at the Montbrook site in Florida and shown TFF this great photo of a Rynchotherium tusk. Note the enamel "band" that partially covers the tusk. NICE unusual finds!!!

P2027667Tusk2.jpg.a4e3f8ad70f3d66c253241f1e0828e76.jpg

Thank you for the reply and the advice for identifying the tusk. I believe i Have a Gomp with all the resources and tips.

 

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