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My assistant and I checked out a place in Round Rock, Texas where the Del Rio, Buda, and Eagle Ford are close by. I read about the area in some online papers and I used Google maps to make a plan. I'm new and learning, and we try to explore a couple areas a week. (I'd be happy to share the address if any local folks want to check out the area.) 

 

We followed a drainage creek to a bigger creek, and then found some interesting creek walls. I was happy to see something besides Austin Chalk.

 

We trekked through waist deep water and saw some interesting cliffs. We always find frogs, snakes, and lizards too. I didn't find any interesting fossils within the creek walls or floor. But I did find a rock on a gravel bar with some teeth in it. 

 

The big one is about 1/2 inch, and the small one is 1cm. I have no idea what they are from. I tried to take pictures using a ruler for scale. Using a little microscope camera I can see the little tooth has a cool serrated edge.

 

Any ideas what the teeth could be from?

 

 

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Tidgy's Dad

Not from the frog. :D

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ThePhysicist

Looks like y'all got a couple of shark teeth there! :meg: The small, serrated one must be Squalicorax, the "crow" shark - it's the only Cretaceous shark with serrations. The larger one is a lamniform "mackerel" shark, but not much else can be said since it's incomplete. It could be Cretolamna or Cretoxyrhina perhaps. 

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Can we get sharper, better-lit photos of that serrated tooth in multiple views?

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I agree with Carl. - it seems to me that that serrated tooth is a bit long and stout to be Squalicorax, despite its serrations. The first one especially seems to be a little stout.... I have a hunch you may have something cooler, but more bright, sharp pictures are needed

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I bought a little microscope camera and printed some grid paper. (Coco, I'm trying. I promise!)

 

I also found a couple more teeth in the same rock. Ptychodus?

 

But in seriousness. I appreciate the comments/feedback. 

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You for sure have a Ptychodus. It seems that squalicorax tooth is broken in half - hence my initial confusion about its shape.Cool find!

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22 hours ago, Jared C said:

You for sure have a Ptychodus. It seems that squalicorax tooth is broken in half - hence my initial confusion about its shape.Cool find!

Same!

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