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Texas Pennsylvanian ID Help


historianmichael

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historianmichael

I found this a few weeks ago at an exposure of the Late Pennsylvanian Colony Creek Shale in west-central Texas. I have no idea what it could be. It seems like a partial something, but I just don't know what. Maybe some type of cephalopod? Any thoughts are greatly appreciated. I thought the pattern was interesting enough to pick it up and try to figure it out. Thank you!

 

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Edited by historianmichael
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The first picture makes me want to say some broken cross section of an ammonite, but I’m not really sure what to make of some of the other views. I’m envisioning some sort of broken septa in that initial view but it’s not entirely convincing to me. Hopefully someone will feel more certain about some other suggestion. Very interesting piece. 

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Yes definitely an ammonoid but not an ammonite. It's a goniatite probably in the Agathiceratidae family, like Vidrioceras sp. which is found in the Pennsylvanian of Texas. Very worn so a good ID may be hard.

 

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