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Egg or Rock?


MaybeAnEgg

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Hello everyone, I found yall on google while trying to get info about this interesting rock I found in the Fossile Coast area of Oregon a few months ago.

 

Photos are attached and here is some info about it...

 

Found in flowing water at the extended base of a 300 foot waterfall,. Its the tallest in the state but I forgot its name. The surrounding rock was all black and dark shades of earth., mostly basalt. My find was the only stone of a light color i saw in vicinity, both in the water and on the trail.

 

The surface is smooth, certainly been in water a loooong time, almost feels like porcelain. There are small details in the surface that are visible, but cannot be felt.

 

 

Attached is a 360 view of the top and sides. I stood it up for seeing the side it rest on. The measure lines are millimeters, total of 40.

 

Thanks for helping!

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Edited by MaybeAnEgg
Added measure length
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Whats the confirmation sign so I can learn to tell? I read the post about rocks vs eggs, but wasnt sure so I made a post

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The first sign would be the absence of any discernible fossil egg texture.

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Fossil eggs, especially complete ones are very rare.  I personally don't know of any from coastal Oregon.  On the other hand, wave-smoothened stones like these are very common.  Also, although smooth, this stone is also not that egg-shaped. Our brains are programmed to look for patterns and shapes that we have seen before, even in situations when they don't exist.  On the Oregon coast, your best bets for finds will be fossil molluscs, i.e., clams and snails.

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Did you do a complete read through both of the "Think you found an Egg basic"   and  "Think you found an Egg- advanced" posts?

 

Texture, or lack thereof, and location found, would rule out egg for me.  :(

Multnomah County is only known for invertebrate fossils.

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Looks like you're gonna have to change your name to NotAnEgg :P

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