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Need help identifying several different things.


Sandfossil

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Constichus? #1

 

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#2

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#3

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#4

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#5 Brachiopod?

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#6 Brachiopod?

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#7 Brachiopod?

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#8  Brachiopod

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#9

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#10

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#11

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#12

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#13 Horn coral?

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#13

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Goodness, sooo many pictures,  a lot of them are too dark to make anything out and will be difficult to reference each one without numbers.  You can still edit and that would be very helpful.  Which I'm doing now, I might even suggest breaking them up into groups of similar things and post those individually.

Edited by Lone Hunter
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4 minutes ago, Lone Hunter said:

Goodness, sooo many pictures,  a lot of them are too dark to make anything out and will be difficult to reference each one without numbers.  You can still edit and that would be very helpful.  Which I'm doing now, I might even suggest breaking them up into groups of similar things and post those individually.

Sorry thats at my kitchen stove. I can try going to a different room to see if the lighting is better. I don't have a computer so trying to do the best I can with this old phone. I am still trying to figure out how to post properly. Boy do I have issues. lol I will see what I can do. The number thing sounds great.  Can I delete or should I try to edit? Thanks for your advice.

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Just edit if possible,  feel free to ask questions if you have problems.  It can take awhile to get the hang of everything :)@Fossildude19  might have better advice on what to do.

Edited by Lone Hunter
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21 minutes ago, Lone Hunter said:

Just edit if possible,  feel free to ask questions if you have problems.  It can take awhile to get the hang of everything :)@Fossildude19  might have better advice on what to do.

Thank you. I was just about to throw in the towel. 

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Not sure on #1 and 2

#3 and 4 look like sedimentary structures, ie not fossils

#5 through #12 do indeed appear to be brachiopods

#13 is a horn coral

If we knew the age of the rocks or formation, it might be easier to narrow down the ID’s.  Some good looking fossils there. 

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1-2 I have no idea. Better light and additional photos would help

3-4 looks geologic to me but can't say for sure.

5 and 7 I would guess mollusk?

8-12 are brachiopods but I don't know the areas species at all

13 is horn coral.

 

Nice finds!

 

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Please state where these were found. State, County/region if possible.

People sometimes post things they found on vacation, while traveling, or from areas different from where they live.

It is always a good idea to list the location found in the body of your posts, so we can determine what aged strata may outcrop in your area.

Also helpful is whether they were found loose(float), or in a stream( possibly eroded from elsewhere, and transported to your location) , or directly removed from a rock exposure/roadcut etc..

 

 

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5 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Please state where these were found. State, County/region if possible.

People sometimes post things they found on vacation, while traveling, or from areas different from where they live.

It is always a good idea to list the location found in the body of your posts, so we can determine what aged strata may outcrop in your area.

Also helpful is whether they were found loose(float), or in a stream( possibly eroded from elsewhere, and transported to your location) , or directly removed from a rock exposure/roadcut etc..

 

 

I thought I had posted the city and state Muskogee, Ok near the Arkansas river. This is the location in which I live and hunt. Most of the fossils were found in some layering of huge rocks on the side of a mountain where the Arkansas river meets Spaniard creek and Brewers bend. Some of the large  rocks are thrust upwards and are in layers. 

I do apoligize for my lack of  knowledge of formations and periods of the area.  But is known for sandstone, limestone and shale. 

Some of the items above were picked up in the pasture which is low lying on the way toward the mountain area.I read that this area was know for low warm ocean waters. 

I hope to learn more. And thank you for the advice. I will try to be more descriptive.

 

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Sorry - My mistake. I missed your first post.

 

Here is a list of Geologic formations in Muskogee County, OK.  (Blue text =clickable links)

 

Here is a list of sites from THIS WEBSITE.

Information is very old, and no longer accurate, as it was taken from old scientific papers/publications.

 

OKSITES.JPG

 

It is a good place to start your research from, though.  :)

 

Good luck.

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#2 looks like a geodized crinoid stem or similar. I don't know if the geological time and location may accept this. :headscratch:

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It appears most of the bedrock in your area is Pennsylvanian in age, which makes sense as many of the brachiopods look like they could be from that age. #5 and #7 are not mollusks but are brachiopods, probably one of the Productids, maybe something like Echinoconchus. Several of the other brachiopods are also productids but #8 is not, it might be a Neospirifer.   The horn coral is unlikely to be Rhizophyllum as that genus is from the Silurian or Devonian (unless you can find some rocks of that age in your area), but horn corals can be difficult to ID positively without thin sections or at least knowing the specific formation and what has been reported from that zone.   You can go to the Dallas Paleo website and find sone good guides to Pennsylvanian fossils. Here is a link to the brachiopods section:

https://dallaspaleo.org/resources/Documents/PGUPFT 1 brachiopoda.pdf

 

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23 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Sorry - My mistake. I missed your first post.

 

Here is a list of Geologic formations in Muskogee County, OK.  (Blue text =clickable links)

 

Here is a list of sites from THIS WEBSITE.

Information is very old, and no longer accurate, as it was taken from old scientific papers/publications.

 

OKSITES.JPG

 

It is a good place to start your research from, though.  :)

 

Good luck.

Thank you so much. Hopefully I can get it figured out. Going to check it out now.

Are all of those formations found in Muskogee Co., at the %'s listed? And how would I know which particular formation for the rock I find? Does elevatiin play a part? Thanks again.

Edited by Sandfossil
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15 hours ago, ClearLake said:

It appears most of the bedrock in your area is Pennsylvanian in age, which makes sense as many of the brachiopods look like they could be from that age. #5 and #7 are not mollusks but are brachiopods, probably one of the Productids, maybe something like Echinoconchus. Several of the other brachiopods are also productids but #8 is not, it might be a Neospirifer.   The horn coral is unlikely to be Rhizophyllum as that genus is from the Silurian or Devonian (unless you can find some rocks of that age in your area), but horn corals can be difficult to ID positively without thin sections or at least knowing the specific formation and what has been reported from that zone.   You can go to the Dallas Paleo website and find sone good guides to Pennsylvanian fossils. Here is a link to the brachiopods section:

https://dallaspaleo.org/resources/Documents/PGUPFT 1 brachiopoda.pdf

 

Such great information thank you for taking the time to respond, It is greatly appreciated.

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