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paleoflor

L.S.,

 

Hope someone on TFF can help me with the identification of a plant fragment from the Lower Devonian (Pragian) of the Belgian Ardennes. The specimen in question consists of a 17 mm-long, 12 mm-wide oval-shaped body, which is seemingly covered in equant scales (though this could also be an artefact of the surface preservation) and has curved spine-like protrusions (see right hand-side of specimen in first two photographs). The detailed structure of the specimen is quite difficult to capture, so I added four photographs taken under different lighting conditions. Hope this is enough to showcase the main features. To my eye, the overall texture and "spines" do resemble those of Drepanophycus-like stems, which have been observed at the locality. However, I find it difficult to explain the oval-shape of this structure in terms of a stem fragment. This rounded shape gives it an almost strobilar appearance. The specimen is associated with long, naked axes having a smooth surface, present in the same slab of rock, but not in organic connection. Other floral elements encountered at the locality mainly include zosterophyllopsids.

 

TKTW0807-0004.thumb.jpg.3f3f3d39ec37b2a2c0aaf9f4b476abd6.jpg TKTW0807-0001.thumb.jpg.3bde47c37919ecedc7160ae94c365446.jpg TKTW0807-0002.thumb.jpg.ad0aad0e2674000b83fe10f3e46894e9.jpg TKTW0807-0003.thumb.jpg.96a3c5d2d997b2308d930dfcbd39f2de.jpg 
 

Are you aware of any scaled strobilar structures from the worldwide Lower Devonian to which I could compare my Belgian find? Or do you think this specimen should be interpreted as a (rounded) stem fragment? I'm really struggling with this one, so I would love to hear your thoughts! 

 

Kind regards,

 

Tim

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Pertica, Maine's state fossil, is drawn as having sporangia sort of shaped this way.

It's probably not a help, but it's all I've got. :Confused05:

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paleoflor
7 hours ago, Rockwood said:

Pertica, Maine's state fossil, is drawn as having sporangia sort of shaped this way.

It's probably not a help, but it's all I've got. :Confused05:

 

Thanks for the suggestion! I looked at a few papers on Pertica, but I don't think it's a match, unfortunately.

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Hi Tim 

I did some digging on this all I could find that might possibly match is Agloaphyton major

I'm probably wrong 

 

https://www.fossilhunters.xyz/fossil-plants-2/a-glaophyton-major.html

 

Hope this helps 

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Fossildude19

I can't help with ID, but it is a beautiful fossil, Tim.

Congratulations on this cool find.

Let us know if you do get any word on it.

 

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paleoflor
6 hours ago, ckmerlin said:

Hi Tim 

I did some digging on this all I could find that might possibly match is Agloaphyton major

I'm probably wrong 

 

https://www.fossilhunters.xyz/fossil-plants-2/a-glaophyton-major.html

 

Hope this helps 

 

Thanks for the input. Must say I never considered the Rhynie chert flora, as the mode of preservation is do very different... Unfortunately, however, the sporangia of Aglaophyton majus are slightly smaller than this specimen and I cannot find any data on them having scales or spines (available reconstructions show relatively smooth shapes).

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paleoflor
5 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

I can't help with ID, but it is a beautiful fossil, Tim.

Congratulations on this cool find.

Let us know if you do get any word on it.

 

 

Will do, though, I'm starting to think more and more that I might be dealing with an oddly shaped bit of Drepanophycus-like stem...

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