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Show Us Your Fossils Challenge Mode: Ordered By Geologic Time Period!


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For the Devonian, a partial crown of the crinoid Gennaeocrinus variabilis from the Bell Shale of Rockport, Michigan, USA. 3 cm long.

 

D721BBD2-FB7C-4D55-91AB-F78D1CE074BE.thumb.jpeg.9004fc88b80a4ab485e12a331981821d.jpeg

Edited by Mochaccino
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For the Carboniferous, I couldn't make my mind up which of these worms to add, so hopefully it's okay if I add three. :)

Mazoglossus ramsdelli

Archisymplectes rhoton 

Didontogaster cordylina

All are from the Francis Creek shale. PXL_20220805_211556976.thumb.jpg.06930b7648d4d1d2d690f958d79604f9.jpg

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Since the Mississippian was skipped, I'll go from the Desmoinesian to the Missourian.... :)

 

Chondrichthyan fin

Muncie Creek Shale, Missourian/Kasimovian Stage, Pennsylvanian

Kansas City metro, KS/MO, USA

 

post-6808-0-36773400-1372057605.thumb.jpg.5ec3751876e3cb1778ae32c23dd6de9f.jpg

 

Denticles, up close:

 

post-6808-0-57329100-1372057879.thumb.jpg.956b92c7bf260eddcaf19b85dd34b2c1.jpg

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Oklahoma Permian Amphibian Bolterpeton jaw and teeth

191587752_xoAmphibianBolterpeton.thumb.jpg.6061a914c37602b4e8f9df6aa4f91cbd.jpg

 

 

 

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52 minutes ago, Missourian said:

Since the Mississippian was skipped, I'll go from the Desmoinesian to the Missourian.... :)

 

Chondrichthyan fin

Muncie Creek Shale, Pennsylvanian

Kansas City metro, KS/MO, USA

 

post-6808-0-36773400-1372057605.thumb.jpg.5ec3751876e3cb1778ae32c23dd6de9f.jpg

 

Denticles, up close:

 

post-6808-0-57329100-1372057879.thumb.jpg.956b92c7bf260eddcaf19b85dd34b2c1.jpg

Sorry, I forgot about the Mississippian.

Edited by Pleuromya
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24 minutes ago, Pleuromya said:

Sorry, I forgot about the Mississippian.

 

Not a problem at all :). Your post was Carboniferous, which could be either Mississippian or Pennsylvanian.

 

Since the Carboniferous is a special case, the options could be:

 

  • Mississippian, then Pennsylvanian
  • Carboniferous, then Pennsylvanian, since Mississippian is lower Carboniferous in much of the world (in my case, I bumped up a stage)
  • Carboniferous only and on to Permian, if no one with Penn material is paying attention :)

 

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10 hours ago, Bringing Fossils to Life said:

Sorry; didn't see the Devonian was already taken.

No problem, its all for good fun and education :).

Thanks for contributing :dinothumb:!

Franz Bernhard

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10 hours ago, Bringing Fossils to Life said:

Sorry; didn't see the Devonian was already taken.

 

It's okay.  You're allowed to double the Devonian from time to time.

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7 hours ago, Missourian said:

 

Not a problem at all :). Your post was Carboniferous, which could be either Mississippian or Pennsylvanian.

 

Since the Carboniferous is a special case, the options could be:

 

  • Mississippian, then Pennsylvanian
  • Carboniferous, then Pennsylvanian, since Mississippian is lower Carboniferous in much of the world (in my case, I bumped up a stage)
  • Carboniferous only and on to Permian, if no one with Penn material is paying attention :)

 

 

Yes, that is exactly how I've been thinking it because sometimes you get a label that just says "Carboniferous."  In this game, don't let that paralyze you.  Feel free to roll on into the Permian from there.

 

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Monophyllites simonyi from the Middle Triassic Carnian layers on the Millibrunnkogel in the Upper Austrian Alps.

 

A760a.1.thumb.jpg.0bc53a52d6087989f92e9d16d07c46a0.jpg

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Vermiceras scylla from the Early Jurassic Sinemurian near Rottweil in southern Germany.

 

A352a.1.thumb.jpg.123c2052f4b979428645348b8ea3eadb.jpg

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How did it happen that I missed this thread? :duh2:

 

obraz.png.0f0e8bbb51d94f343ccb93a0a6e00c99.png

 

Callovian ammos from Łuków, Poland.

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50 minutes ago, Kasia said:

How did it happen that I missed this thread?

Fossil hunting on mars, maybe ;)?

 

The last Cretaceous one I have in the pipeline. Very crushed, but nicely patterned shell. Polished transverse section, of course ;):

Vaccinites_Roe2_AN4532_kompr.jpg.3898716fb5ee8f66169bc4e1b44335d0.jpg

Franz Bernhard

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7 hours ago, Pleuromya said:

These are from the fish Sparus, from the Palaeocene Phosphate Beds of Ben Idir, Morocco. 

PXL_20220807_103705061.jpg

 

What are they?  Otoliths?

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1 hour ago, siteseer said:

 

What are they?  Otoliths?

I think they are teeth, but unfortunately I can't get any higher magnification.

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22 minutes ago, Pleuromya said:

I think they are teeth, but unfortunately I can't get any higher magnification.

 

Okay.  I see.  The one on the right looks different.  I know how difficult it can be to get a clear photo.

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The extinct shark, Serratolamna aschersoni.  It's a common species from the Early Eocene of Morocco but uncommon from the Early Eocene of the Chesapeake Bay region.  It does not occur in the Early Eocene London Clay of England.  S. aschersoni was apparently a warm water form of the Tethys Ocean that spread into the western Atlantic.  It's absence in the London Clay has been explained as that environment having been a cooler, deeper one.

 

This tooth comes from the Early Eocene Bashi Marl of the Red Hot Truck Stop locality at Meridian, Lauderdale County, Mississippi.  The Bashi has been described as a member of the Hatchetigbee Formation but I've seen references to it as a formation. 

 

The tooth measures 20mm and was photographed on graph paper (1/4 inch squares) for scale in inches.  The crown has more of a spearhead shape than most teeth seen.

ascher_ms1a.jpg

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30 minutes ago, siteseer said:

 

Okay.  I see.  The one on the right looks different.  I know how difficult it can be to get a clear photo.

I'll see if I can get a better photo during the daylight tomorrow. :)

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Here an internal cast of Acanthocardia sp. Miocene.
From the outskirts of my city. Elche. ( Alicante ). Spain.

 

 

IMG_20220717_110910203.thumb.jpg.9fa0919e008eba736acd2f107ad138b2.jpg

 

 

 

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Here's a bird beak from the Late Pleistocene, McKittrick tar pit site, Kern County, CA.  It's about 2 5/8 inches (67mm) long.  It might look like two different specimens but it's the same one.  The shots were just taken at least several months apart.  It might be a vulture beak.

tarpit_beak1.jpg

tarpit_beak1a.jpg

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3 hours ago, siteseer said:

Here's a bird beak from the Late Pleistocene, McKittrick tar pit site, Kern County, CA.  It's about 2 5/8 inches (67mm) long.  It might look like two different specimens but it's the same one.  The shots were just taken at least several months apart.  It might be a vulture beak.

tarpit_beak1.jpg

tarpit_beak1a.jpg

 

WOW, looks deadly! Is that just the beak or part of the skull as well? What is that large hole?

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